How to strengthen your BYOD security

Many businesses are adopting bring your own device (BYOD) policies as more employees work from home. The problem is, if you’re not careful, BYOD can expose your company to major cybersecurity risks, including the following.

  • Loss or theft of devices – Employees often bring their personal devices wherever they go. This means there’s a higher chance of devices, as well as the data stored in them, being lost or stolen.
  • Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks – Cybercriminals can intercept information transmitted from employees’ devices if these are connected to poorly secured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Jailbroken devices – Jailbreaking is the process of removing the restrictions imposed by the manufacturer of a device, typically to allow the installation of unauthorized third-party software. This increases the risk of an employee inadvertently installing malicious software on a personal device.
  • Security vulnerabilities – If employees have outdated operating systems and software on their devices, cybercriminals can exploit unpatched vulnerabilities to gain unfettered access to company systems
  • Malware – A personal device that has been infected with malware can spread that malware to other devices that are connected to the company network and cause data loss and downtime.

To mitigate these risks, you must devise a BYOD security policy that works for the needs of your business as well as the needs of your employees. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Set passwords on all BYOD devices

Prevent unauthorized access to company data by enforcing the use of passwords on all employee devices and accounts. Passwords should be unique; contain letters, numbers, and symbols; and are at least 12 characters long. It’s also a good idea to implement multifactor authentication to add another method of identity verification such as fingerprint scans or temporary passcodes sent via email.

2. Blacklist unsanctioned applications

Blacklisting involves prohibiting the installation of certain applications on BYOD devices that are used for work purposes. This includes applications like games, social networking apps, and third-party file sharing platforms. The simplest way to blacklist applications is through a mobile device management platform that enables IT administrators to secure and enforce policies on enrolled devices.

3. Restrict data access

Adopt the principle of least privilege on both BYOD and company devices. This means that a user is able to access only the data and software required to do their job. This can reduce the effects of certain types of malware and limit the fallout in the event of a data breach.

4. Invest in anti-malware software

Anti-malware software identifies and removes malware before they cause irreparable harm to a device. The best anti-malware programs are often backed by the latest threat intelligence databases and use behavior-based detection techniques to pick up any traces of malware.

5. Backing up device data

A well-thought-out BYOD policy can go a long way toward minimizing the risk of a security breach, but if something manages to slip past your defenses, you need to have backups prepared. Back up your data in off-site servers and in the cloud to ensure that any data stored locally on a device can be quickly recovered.

6. Educate your staff about security

The vast majority of BYOD-related security risks involve human error. This is why you should educate your employees about proper mobile safety. Train them on spotting apps that could contain malware, sharing security threat updates, and securing their devices beyond enabling default security settings.

You should also approach us if you need assistance with protecting your BYOD environment. As a professional managed IT services provider, we keep tabs on the latest trends and innovations related to BYOD and will recommend solutions that work for your company. Contact us today to see how we can help.

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BYOD tips to improve security

Lax bring your own device (BYOD) policies are a growing concern for businesses. If you’re not managing your organization’s BYOD policy properly, it can pose a host of security risks to your company. Below are some of the inherent security risks of BYOD.

  • Loss or theft of devices – Employees often bring their personal devices wherever they go. This means there’s a higher chance of devices, as well as the data stored in them, being lost or stolen.
  • Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks – Cybercriminals can intercept information transmitted from employees’ devices if these are connected to poorly secured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Jailbroken devices – Jailbreaking is the process of removing the restrictions imposed by the manufacturer of a device, typically to allow the installation of unauthorized third-party software. This increases the risk of an employee inadvertently installing malicious software on a personal device.
  • Security vulnerabilities – If employees have outdated operating systems and software on their devices, cybercriminals can exploit unpatched vulnerabilities to gain unfettered access to company systems
  • Malware – A personal device that has been infected with malware can spread that malware to other devices that are connected to the company network and cause data loss and downtime.

To mitigate these risks, you must devise a BYOD security policy that works for the needs of your business as well as the needs of your employees. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Set passwords on all BYOD devices

Prevent unauthorized access to company data by enforcing the use of passwords on all employee devices and accounts. Passwords should be unique; contain letters, numbers, and symbols; and are at least 12 characters long. It’s also a good idea to implement multifactor authentication to add another method of identity verification such as fingerprint scans or temporary passcodes sent via email.

2. Blacklist unsanctioned applications

Blacklisting involves prohibiting the installation of certain applications on BYOD devices that are used for work purposes. This includes applications like games, social networking apps, and third-party file sharing platforms. The simplest way to blacklist applications is through a mobile device management platform that enables IT administrators to secure and enforce policies on enrolled devices.

3. Restrict data access

Adopt the principle of least privilege on both BYOD and company devices. This means that a user is able to access only the data and software required to do their job. This can reduce the effects of certain types of malware and limit the fallout in the event of a data breach.

4. Invest in anti-malware software

Anti-malware software identifies and removes malware before they cause irreparable harm to a device. The best anti-malware programs are often backed by the latest threat intelligence databases and use behavior-based detection techniques to pick up any traces of malware.

5. Backing up device data

A well-thought-out BYOD policy can go a long way toward minimizing the risk of a security breach, but if something manages to slip past your defenses, you need to have backups prepared. Back up your data in off-site servers and in the cloud to ensure that any data stored locally on a device can be quickly recovered.

6. Educate your staff about security

The vast majority of BYOD-related security risks involve human error. This is why you should educate your employees about proper mobile safety. Train them on spotting apps that could contain malware, sharing security threat updates, and securing their devices beyond enabling default security settings.

You should also approach us if you need assistance with protecting your BYOD environment. As a professional managed IT services provider, we keep tabs on the latest trends and innovations related to BYOD and will recommend solutions that work for your company. Contact us today to see how we can help.

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Security best practices for BYOD policies

Bring your own device (BYOD) policies give employees the flexibility to use devices they are comfortable with while allowing businesses to reduce hardware spending. However, BYOD also carries plenty of security risks.

  • Loss or theft of devices – Employees often bring their personal devices wherever they go. This means there’s a higher chance of devices, as well as the data stored in them, being lost or stolen.
  • Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks – Cybercriminals can intercept information transmitted from employees’ devices if these are connected to poorly secured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Jailbroken devices – Jailbreaking is the process of removing the restrictions imposed by the manufacturer of a device, typically to allow the installation of unauthorized third-party software. This increases the risk of an employee inadvertently installing malicious software on a personal device.
  • Security vulnerabilities – If employees have outdated operating systems and software on their devices, cybercriminals can exploit unpatched vulnerabilities to gain unfettered access to company systems
  • Malware – A personal device that has been infected with malware can spread that malware to other devices that are connected to the company network and cause data loss and downtime.

To mitigate these risks, you must devise a BYOD security policy that works for the needs of your business as well as the needs of your employees. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Set passwords on all BYOD devices

Prevent unauthorized access to company data by enforcing the use of passwords on all employee devices and accounts. Passwords should be unique; contain letters, numbers, and symbols; and are at least 12 characters long. It’s also a good idea to implement multifactor authentication to add another method of identity verification such as fingerprint scans or temporary passcodes sent via email.

2. Blacklist unsanctioned applications

Blacklisting involves prohibiting the installation of certain applications on BYOD devices that are used for work purposes. This includes applications like games, social networking apps, and third-party file sharing platforms. The simplest way to blacklist applications is through a mobile device management platform that enables IT administrators to secure and enforce policies on enrolled devices.

3. Restrict data access

Adopt the principle of least privilege on both BYOD and company devices. This means that a user is able to access only the data and software required to do their job. This can reduce the effects of certain types of malware and limit the fallout in the event of a data breach.

4. Invest in anti-malware software

Anti-malware software identifies and removes malware before they cause irreparable harm to a device. The best anti-malware programs are often backed by the latest threat intelligence databases and use behavior-based detection techniques to pick up any traces of malware.

5. Backing up device data

A well-thought-out BYOD policy can go a long way toward minimizing the risk of a security breach, but if something manages to slip past your defenses, you need to have backups prepared. Back up your data in off-site servers and in the cloud to ensure that any data stored locally on a device can be quickly recovered.

6. Educate your staff about security

The vast majority of BYOD-related security risks involve human error. This is why you should educate your employees about proper mobile safety. Train them on spotting apps that could contain malware, sharing security threat updates, and securing their devices beyond enabling default security settings.

You should also approach us if you need assistance with protecting your BYOD environment. As a professional managed IT services provider, we keep tabs on the latest trends and innovations related to BYOD and will recommend solutions that work for your company. Contact us today to see how we can help.

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A Flexible Partnership With IT Professionals

It’s hard to see how investing in your company’s IT services would be as incentivizing as other investments that might deliver a more tangible ROI. However, ensuring that your IT department has a competent team that’s up-to-date on the latest cyber security knowledge and has access to the latest software to allow them to do their jobs well is a sounder investment than you might think.

Investing in your IT services is a little like buckling your seat belt before you drive to work in the morning. You’re certainly not planning on getting in a crash that day, but you know that if you do, the seat belt will keep you safe, or at least mitigate the bodily damage the crash could cause.

We live in a world where it pays for companies to be on the forefront of cyber security. Even in just the past few years, ransomware and other cyber-attacks have become increasingly common, and they target antiquated IT systems that have yet to get with the times. If hackers can infiltrate your company’s servers and hold that data hostage, it could financially cripple your company to try to get it back – or shut it down entirely. It could also destroy your company’s reputation and hurt your clients and customers.

You need an IT team that you can depend on to keep your company safe, but that still leaves the problem of cost. We get it: keeping your IT up-to-date is expensive, whether because you can’t afford to hire the right number of IT professionals or because you can’t afford the software necessary for keeping your company from getting hacked. That’s why we believe co-managed IT is the best option for companies looking to protect their employees and their customers’ sensitive data.

Co-managed IT is a means by which growing companies can have access to all the tools and knowledge necessary to protect their data without paying the full cost. It won’t replace your current IT team, and it’s more than just a one-off project-based relationship with an outside IT service – it’s a flexible partnership between your business and IT services that you can trust.

Say your existing IT team does a stellar job of putting out the little fires that inevitably happen throughout the workday, but they struggle to find time for building and updating company security systems and protocols that will keep your data safe in the event of a cyber-attack. Or your company is going through a period of rapid expansion, and you can’t hire enough people for your IT department quickly enough to secure your ever-growing databases. Or perhaps your IT team does a stellar job of finding balance between the daily tasks and preventive maintenance, but they lack the software tools to do so efficiently. In all these scenarios, co-managed IT can ensure that those gaps your IT team just can’t fill on their own get filled through a collaborative effort.

Co-managed IT can be a great solution for a burnt-out, potentially disgruntled IT team. If you don’t know whether your IT team is getting burnt out or not, you can look for a few different signs. If they’re constantly working late or on weekends, they’re not getting projects done on time or correctly, they aren’t creating any new security measures or they’re showing signs of aggression or frustration at their job, you might be burdened with a burnt-out IT team.

Ideally, a burnt-out IT team would welcome help with their responsibilities and see the benefits of the collaborative effort between them and another group of experienced IT professionals. Together, we can protect your company from hackers, if you’re willing to invest in your IT infrastructure. Even though you might think that keeping things the way they are won’t cost you a dime, with how common cyber-attacks are becoming, it could only be a matter of time before hackers hold your data for ransom and cost you everything.

With all this in mind, we strongly encourage you and your IT lead to come to a diagnostic consultation with us. We’ll help you understand how, moving forward, co-managed IT can save your company a boatload of money and trouble.

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How Co – Managed IT Could Save Your Company From Financial Disaster

When you consider the investments in your business that you can make as a CEO, you probably think to yourself, “Which investments will give my company the best ROI?” With that in mind, would you think of making a significant investment in bolstering your IT department?

Many CEOs are understandably hesitant to throw a lot of money into their IT department because the ROI is more difficult to estimate. That said, though, consistently updating your company’s IT services is becoming increasingly crucial to the continued success, and indeed safety, of your company. Ransomware and other cyber-attacks that steal company data are becoming more frequent and more costly, while IT departments continually get the short end of the budgetary stick.

While that all undoubtedly sounds horrible, you might be wondering just what you can do about it. After all, you only have so much money you can invest back into your company’s IT department, and it might not be sufficient for keeping your IT staff from getting burned out, disgruntled or making costly mistakes – even when they’re performing their responsibilities to the best of their abilities.

What if there were a way that you could have access to the most up-to-date IT knowledge and software while also not having to shell out the funds necessary to update your systems and hire more knowledgeable employees? Well, that’s where co-managed IT can be your company’s life preserver.

Co-managed IT is a flexible system for keeping data for your company, employees and clients safe from cyber-attacks as well as assisting in your daily operations where needed. Think of it as “filling in the gaps” that your current IT department (try as they might) struggle to fill.

For instance, say your current IT department is great at taking care of the day-to-day fires that inevitably come up in a normal workday, but they struggle to get to the “important but not urgent” task of updating your company’s cyber security and creating data backups. Maybe it’s the other way around, where your IT department is very focused on security, but they struggle to find time to assist employees with password resets and buggy programs. Maybe neither of these cases describes your IT department, but they still need better access to the tools and software that would allow them to reach their full potential in protecting the company’s sensitive information. Or maybe your company is going through a period of rapid expansion, and you just don’t have time to build the kind of IT infrastructure that would best serve your needs.

Regardless of what your IT department’s current needs are, co-managed IT is the solution. We’re here to do the tasks and provide the tools that your current IT department just can’t provide. Make no mistake, however: our intent is not to replace your current IT leader or team. In fact, we rely on the expertise that your IT department has about your systems. That’s what makes up the “co” in “co-managed IT.”

In order for co-managed IT to work, your company’s IT department will need to see us as an ally in doing their job, not as an adversary. At the same time, they’ll also need to be open to new ways of doing things. The world of cyber security is constantly changing, and if your IT department is set in their ways and unwilling to budge, your company will be left with an antiquated system, chock-full of valuable data that hackers and cybercriminals can easily exploit.

Finally, however, in order for co-managed IT to work, your company still must be willing to invest in its IT department. We know that the ROI might not be as clear as it is for some other investments, but trust us, the consequences of not having up-to-date IT services if (or when) hackers steal your sensitive data could financially devastate your company – or even end it altogether.

So, with that in mind, we hope you’ll consider the benefits of co-managed IT and how it can make your company safe from cyber-attacks and bring you peace of mind.

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Save on electricity with these PC tips

When it comes to saving energy, every little effort goes a long way. The more energy-efficient your PC is, the more money you save. In fact, you can save up to $50 a year if you activate your PC’s power-saving feature. Further increase your savings by following these tips:

1. Unplug your computer when not in use

When you’re not using your computer, it’s best to shut it down and unplug it. This is because a plugged-in PC — even when switched off — still consumes standby power.

2. Disconnect external devices

When they’re connected to your PC, devices such as printers, headphones, and webcams consume power even when they’re not in use. This is why you should disconnect or remove external devices from your PC once you’re done using them.

3. Alternatively, use a smart strip, especially for computers you cannot turn off

A smart strip is a series of several electrical outlets in one strip, with circuits to monitor and maximize your gadgets’ power consumption. It can electronically unplug any device so that they stop drawing current, which saves energy. By connecting your PC and peripherals (e.g., printers, scanners) to the smart strip, you won’t need to unplug your equipment when you’re not using them.

4. Adjust your computer’s energy settings

Adjusting your PC’s power settings will help you consume less energy. For example, you can opt to put your hard drive and monitor into sleep mode when they’re left idle for a few minutes. Lowering the brightness of your screen also saves electricity.

5. Use a charger only when your laptop is charging

When we charge our laptops, we tend to forget about them, leaving them plugged in for hours. Unfortunately, overcharging degrades the battery over time. Leaving the charger plugged in — even if it’s not connected to your computer — also consumes standby power.

To save energy, make sure to unplug your laptop charger once you’re done charging. Alternatively, you can use a wall outlet with a timer or plug your charger into a smart strip.

6. Choose an Energy Star-compliant PC

Energy Star is the US Environmental Protection Agency’s symbol for energy efficiency. Every product that earns the Energy Star symbol is guaranteed to deliver both quality performance and energy savings. The more stars a product has, the more energy-efficient it is. Studies show that a single Energy Star-compliant computer and monitor can save between $7 and $52 per year in electricity bills.

These tips should help you lower your electricity costs and make smart hardware choices. If you need assistance in choosing the best hardware for your specific needs, give us a call. We’ll be glad to help.

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Reduce your PC power consumption

Nowadays, there’s a computer in almost every home and office. A typical desktop that’s switched on 24/7 for a whole year releases carbon dioxide equivalent to what an average car releases in an 820-mile drive. To save energy, you don’t need to make drastic changes. You can start by making small adjustments that will ultimately lead to significant savings.

1. Unplug your computer when not in use

When you’re not using your computer, it’s best to shut it down and unplug it. This is because a plugged-in PC — even when switched off — still consumes standby power.

2. Disconnect external devices

When they’re connected to your PC, devices such as printers, headphones, and webcams consume power even when they’re not in use. This is why you should disconnect or remove external devices from your PC once you’re done using them.

3. Alternatively, use a smart strip, especially for computers you cannot turn off

A smart strip is a series of several electrical outlets in one strip, with circuits to monitor and maximize your gadgets’ power consumption. It can electronically unplug any device so that they stop drawing current, which saves energy. By connecting your PC and peripherals (e.g., printers, scanners) to the smart strip, you won’t need to unplug your equipment when you’re not using them.

4. Adjust your computer’s energy settings

Adjusting your PC’s power settings will help you consume less energy. For example, you can opt to put your hard drive and monitor into sleep mode when they’re left idle for a few minutes. Lowering the brightness of your screen also saves electricity.

5. Use a charger only when your laptop is charging

When we charge our laptops, we tend to forget about them, leaving them plugged in for hours. Unfortunately, overcharging degrades the battery over time. Leaving the charger plugged in — even if it’s not connected to your computer — also consumes standby power.

To save energy, make sure to unplug your laptop charger once you’re done charging. Alternatively, you can use a wall outlet with a timer or plug your charger into a smart strip.

6. Choose an Energy Star-compliant PC

Energy Star is the US Environmental Protection Agency’s symbol for energy efficiency. Every product that earns the Energy Star symbol is guaranteed to deliver both quality performance and energy savings. The more stars a product has, the more energy-efficient it is. Studies show that a single Energy Star-compliant computer and monitor can save between $7 and $52 per year in electricity bills.

These tips should help you lower your electricity costs and make smart hardware choices. If you need assistance in choosing the best hardware for your specific needs, give us a call. We’ll be glad to help.

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6 Ways to save energy with your PC

It may be difficult to save energy when you use your PC every day. In fact, a complete desktop computer setup (i.e., one that includes an internet modem, a pair of loudspeakers, and a printer) that is on for eight hours a day consumes 600 kWh per year. But don’t worry, you can use the following tips to reduce your PC power consumption.

1. Unplug your computer when not in use

When you’re not using your computer, it’s best to shut it down and unplug it. This is because a plugged-in PC — even when switched off — still consumes standby power.

2. Disconnect external devices

When they’re connected to your PC, devices such as printers, headphones, and webcams consume power even when they’re not in use. This is why you should disconnect or remove external devices from your PC once you’re done using them.

3. Alternatively, use a smart strip, especially for computers you cannot turn off

A smart strip is a series of several electrical outlets in one strip, with circuits to monitor and maximize your gadgets’ power consumption. It can electronically unplug any device so that they stop drawing current, which saves energy. By connecting your PC and peripherals (e.g., printers, scanners) to the smart strip, you won’t need to unplug your equipment when you’re not using them.

4. Adjust your computer’s energy settings

Adjusting your PC’s power settings will help you consume less energy. For example, you can opt to put your hard drive and monitor into sleep mode when they’re left idle for a few minutes. Lowering the brightness of your screen also saves electricity.

5. Use a charger only when your laptop is charging

When we charge our laptops, we tend to forget about them, leaving them plugged in for hours. Unfortunately, overcharging degrades the battery over time. Leaving the charger plugged in — even if it’s not connected to your computer — also consumes standby power.

To save energy, make sure to unplug your laptop charger once you’re done charging. Alternatively, you can use a wall outlet with a timer or plug your charger into a smart strip.

6. Choose an Energy Star-compliant PC

Energy Star is the US Environmental Protection Agency’s symbol for energy efficiency. Every product that earns the Energy Star symbol is guaranteed to deliver both quality performance and energy savings. The more stars a product has, the more energy-efficient it is. Studies show that a single Energy Star-compliant computer and monitor can save between $7 and $52 per year in electricity bills.

These tips should help you lower your electricity costs and make smart hardware choices. If you need assistance in choosing the best hardware for your specific needs, give us a call. We’ll be glad to help.

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What do business phone systems look like today?

Although digital communication tools let businesses connect with customers and other stakeholders in an efficient manner, landlines are still used to communicate with business stakeholders. And for many organizations, determining whether to use internet phones or traditional landlines remains a concern. To help you decide, here’s a short guide on different types of business phones and their respective life cycles and technology options.

Different phone systems

Today’s businesses still use landlines to connect with various stakeholders, such as customers, investors, and suppliers, to service their needs. However, telephony has come a long way from when it first came about in 1876. For instance, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones have virtually unlimited reach, are automated, and are cheaper than ever to acquire.

VoIP is a telephony solution that uses the internet instead of wired circuits to transmit data. VoIP does more than just transmit audio — it can also send a variety of data (video, multimedia, SMS, etc.) and perform other tasks as well.

A VoIP system’s hardware (phone units, cables, CPUs, etc.) and software (one or more applications that run the system) can be either on-premises or hosted:

  • On-premises – Hardware and software are physically housed within the premises of the company.
  • Hosted – Some of the hardware, like phone units and other equipment, can be found within the premises. But most, if not all, of the software is hosted online. Service providers look after hosted systems for their clients.

Life cycles: On-premises vs. hosted

With hardware, it doesn’t matter whether it’s on-premises or hosted. Hardware is affected by the wear and tear stemming from daily use. Barring any accidents or physical damage, VoIP hardware should last several years.

On the other hand, software requires regular updates. It’s worth noting that it’s faster and cheaper to update software that’s hosted in the cloud versus one that’s on premises. However, there’s not much difference in how much either one can last — software for both types of VoIP systems can last upwards of 10 years, depending on how dependable your IT support is.

Technology today vs. before

In the past, hardware and software were built to last. Today, they’re built to adapt and change, thanks to cloud technology.

The effect of this shift on hardware and software is dramatic:

Most hardware components are very similar, with replacements and upgrades coming every 5–8 years on average.

Cloud software is faster, easier, and cheaper to upgrade than software for on-premises systems. Critical cloud updates can be released almost constantly, and a cloud system may be completely overhauled in as short as 2–3 years’ time.

Whichever phone system you choose, it should integrate smoothly with the other systems in your business, such as email or customer relationship management software. And as your business expands, your chosen phone system should easily scale with it, too.

Be a step ahead

Downtime results in loss of potential sales and, essentially, wasted money. If your phone service is spotty and constantly unreliable, perhaps it’s time to switch to VoIP phones.

Nowadays, it’s not the longevity of a tech solution that’s important, but rather staying ahead of the curve to trump the competition. Call our experts today so you can always leverage the best VoIP and other IT solutions available today.

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Here are the basics of different VoIP systems

Many businesses still rely heavily on landlines, which remain as one of the first points of contact businesses have with their customers. With the marriage of traditional telephony and digital connectivity comes a more affordable and reliable option: internet phones. Is this the best option for your business? Read on to find out.

Different phone systems

Today’s businesses still use landlines to connect with various stakeholders, such as customers, investors, and suppliers, to service their needs. However, telephony has come a long way from when it first came about in 1876. For instance, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones have virtually unlimited reach, are automated, and are cheaper than ever to acquire.

VoIP is a telephony solution that uses the internet instead of wired circuits to transmit data. VoIP does more than just transmit audio — it can also send a variety of data (video, multimedia, SMS, etc.) and perform other tasks as well.

A VoIP system’s hardware (phone units, cables, CPUs, etc.) and software (one or more applications that run the system) can be either on-premises or hosted:

  • On-premises – Hardware and software are physically housed within the premises of the company.
  • Hosted – Some of the hardware, like phone units and other equipment, can be found within the premises. But most, if not all, of the software is hosted online. Service providers look after hosted systems for their clients.

Life cycles: On-premises vs. hosted

With hardware, it doesn’t matter whether it’s on-premises or hosted. Hardware is affected by the wear and tear stemming from daily use. Barring any accidents or physical damage, VoIP hardware should last several years.

On the other hand, software requires regular updates. It’s worth noting that it’s faster and cheaper to update software that’s hosted in the cloud versus one that’s on premises. However, there’s not much difference in how much either one can last — software for both types of VoIP systems can last upwards of 10 years, depending on how dependable your IT support is.

Technology today vs. before

In the past, hardware and software were built to last. Today, they’re built to adapt and change, thanks to cloud technology.

The effect of this shift on hardware and software is dramatic:

Most hardware components are very similar, with replacements and upgrades coming every 5–8 years on average.

Cloud software is faster, easier, and cheaper to upgrade than software for on-premises systems. Critical cloud updates can be released almost constantly, and a cloud system may be completely overhauled in as short as 2–3 years’ time.

Whichever phone system you choose, it should integrate smoothly with the other systems in your business, such as email or customer relationship management software. And as your business expands, your chosen phone system should easily scale with it, too.

Be a step ahead

Downtime results in loss of potential sales and, essentially, wasted money. If your phone service is spotty and constantly unreliable, perhaps it’s time to switch to VoIP phones.

Nowadays, it’s not the longevity of a tech solution that’s important, but rather staying ahead of the curve to trump the competition. Call our experts today so you can always leverage the best VoIP and other IT solutions available today.

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