Represent your business properly on social media

Social media accounts for businesses are invaluable tools enterprises use to reach out to their client bases to fully understand their needs and wants. Make sure your social media manager understands the proper way to interact with people online, especially those with bad things to say about the company.

Online reputation management mistakes

As long as you have a successful business or brand, people will always have something to say about it. And when it comes to online reputation management, the goal is to create positive engagement with your customers. So if the discussion about your brand swings negative, here are a few online reputation blunders to avoid.

  • Reacting to negative commentary – Negative commentary is generally any commentary that constitutes a verbal attack. As a rule, if it isn’t constructive criticism, it’s probably negative commentary. Feel free to ignore these comments because engaging with them will escalate the conversation further, and fueling those flames are never good for business. It is one thing to stand up for values and principles in a diplomatic manner, and it is a completely different thing to engage in a word war with online commenters who will likely not endure any adverse effects to their negative commentary.
  • Reacting emotionally – If your reaction to negative comments is to fire back with negative comments, you’ll appear unprofessional. Customers want to do business with a brand that is professional. If you react emotionally or negatively to a customer online, who’s to say you wouldn’t do the same in real life to the person reading it? As a social media manager, you are the voice of the business. If your voice is abrasive, immature, and easy to bait into a pissing contest, best believe that your customers will see your business in the same light.

How to resolve negative commentary

While a negative comment about your brand may upset you, don’t let your emotions get the better of you and post something you’ll later regret. Instead, calm down, compose yourself, and follow these guidelines.

  • Figure out what the customer really wants – Every customer wants their problem to be resolved, but how they want their issue fixed will vary. Some customers want an apology, others want a refund, and some may simply want the product they ordered but did not receive. Just because the customer’s comments are poorly phrased doesn’t mean that they don’t have a legitimate grievance. Learn to ignore the personal attack and carefully draw out the true cause for concern.
  • Stick to the facts – When engaging with a customer online, the initial comment can quickly turn into a back-and-forth discussion. If this happens, don’t get off topic when addressing the problem. The customer may try to engage you in a he-said-she-said battle, but avoid taking the bait. Respond with facts, stick to the matter at hand, and don’t get caught up in personal accusations.
  • Turn the negative into a positive – Negative feedback is an opportunity to improve your business. So be honest with yourself and, if there’s truth in the comment, take a good hard look at your company. Did the commenter point out a glaring problem you can improve upon? Remember, a business is nothing without its customers, so it makes sense to do your best to please them.

To learn more about how to best manage your online reputation, or for assistance with any of your IT needs, get in touch with our experts today.

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Avoid online word wars with these reminders

Social media management for businesses can be boiled down to two simple sentences: The internet is full of trolls. Don’t feed the trolls. Read on to find out more about social media gaffes that you will want to avoid, especially when dealing with negative comments on your business posts.

Online reputation management mistakes

As long as you have a successful business or brand, people will always have something to say about it. And when it comes to online reputation management, the goal is to create positive engagement with your customers. So if the discussion about your brand swings negative, here are a few online reputation blunders to avoid.

  • Reacting to negative commentary – Negative commentary is generally any commentary that constitutes a verbal attack. As a rule, if it isn’t constructive criticism, it’s probably negative commentary. Feel free to ignore these comments because engaging with them will escalate the conversation further, and fueling those flames are never good for business. It is one thing to stand up for values and principles in a diplomatic manner, and it is a completely different thing to engage in a word war with online commenters who will likely not endure any adverse effects to their negative commentary.
  • Reacting emotionally – If your reaction to negative comments is to fire back with negative comments, you’ll appear unprofessional. Customers want to do business with a brand that is professional. If you react emotionally or negatively to a customer online, who’s to say you wouldn’t do the same in real life to the person reading it? As a social media manager, you are the voice of the business. If your voice is abrasive, immature, and easy to bait into a pissing contest, best believe that your customers will see your business in the same light.

How to resolve negative commentary

While a negative comment about your brand may upset you, don’t let your emotions get the better of you and post something you’ll later regret. Instead, calm down, compose yourself, and follow these guidelines.

  • Figure out what the customer really wants – Every customer wants their problem to be resolved, but how they want their issue fixed will vary. Some customers want an apology, others want a refund, and some may simply want the product they ordered but did not receive. Just because the customer’s comments are poorly phrased doesn’t mean that they don’t have a legitimate grievance. Learn to ignore the personal attack and carefully draw out the true cause for concern.
  • Stick to the facts – When engaging with a customer online, the initial comment can quickly turn into a back-and-forth discussion. If this happens, don’t get off topic when addressing the problem. The customer may try to engage you in a he-said-she-said battle, but avoid taking the bait. Respond with facts, stick to the matter at hand, and don’t get caught up in personal accusations.
  • Turn the negative into a positive – Negative feedback is an opportunity to improve your business. So be honest with yourself and, if there’s truth in the comment, take a good hard look at your company. Did the commenter point out a glaring problem you can improve upon? Remember, a business is nothing without its customers, so it makes sense to do your best to please them.

To learn more about how to best manage your online reputation, or for assistance with any of your IT needs, get in touch with our experts today.

Posted in General Articles C, Social Media | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Diffuse negative online comments the right way

Current trends show that personalized interactions help establish a business’s persona or identity with prospective customers. This makes the business more relatable and therefore more attractive to more consumers. To use this opportunity properly, social media managers should know how to keep their wits together, especially in the face of negativity online. Read on to learn more.

Online reputation management mistakes

As long as you have a successful business or brand, people will always have something to say about it. And when it comes to online reputation management, the goal is to create positive engagement with your customers. So if the discussion about your brand swings negative, here are a few online reputation blunders to avoid.

  • Reacting to negative commentary – Negative commentary is generally any commentary that constitutes a verbal attack. As a rule, if it isn’t constructive criticism, it’s probably negative commentary. Feel free to ignore these comments because engaging with them will escalate the conversation further, and fueling those flames are never good for business. It is one thing to stand up for values and principles in a diplomatic manner, and it is a completely different thing to engage in a word war with online commenters who will likely not endure any adverse effects to their negative commentary.
  • Reacting emotionally – If your reaction to negative comments is to fire back with negative comments, you’ll appear unprofessional. Customers want to do business with a brand that is professional. If you react emotionally or negatively to a customer online, who’s to say you wouldn’t do the same in real life to the person reading it? As a social media manager, you are the voice of the business. If your voice is abrasive, immature, and easy to bait into a pissing contest, best believe that your customers will see your business in the same light.

How to resolve negative commentary

While a negative comment about your brand may upset you, don’t let your emotions get the better of you and post something you’ll later regret. Instead, calm down, compose yourself, and follow these guidelines.

  • Figure out what the customer really wants – Every customer wants their problem to be resolved, but how they want their issue fixed will vary. Some customers want an apology, others want a refund, and some may simply want the product they ordered but did not receive. Just because the customer’s comments are poorly phrased doesn’t mean that they don’t have a legitimate grievance. Learn to ignore the personal attack and carefully draw out the true cause for concern.
  • Stick to the facts – When engaging with a customer online, the initial comment can quickly turn into a back-and-forth discussion. If this happens, don’t get off topic when addressing the problem. The customer may try to engage you in a he-said-she-said battle, but avoid taking the bait. Respond with facts, stick to the matter at hand, and don’t get caught up in personal accusations.
  • Turn the negative into a positive – Negative feedback is an opportunity to improve your business. So be honest with yourself and, if there’s truth in the comment, take a good hard look at your company. Did the commenter point out a glaring problem you can improve upon? Remember, a business is nothing without its customers, so it makes sense to do your best to please them.

To learn more about how to best manage your online reputation, or for assistance with any of your IT needs, get in touch with our experts today.

Posted in General Articles B, Social Media | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Juice jacking: What is it?

We’ve come to rely on our smartphones to help complete daily tasks, and this has resulted in the need to recharge our phones multiple times a day. But when you’re far from your charger, public charging kiosks can seem like a good substitute. However, this can lead to an incident of “juice jacking.” If this is news to you, find out what juice jacking is and how you can avoid it.

What’s juice jacking?

While newer phones have ditched the cable charger and moved on to wireless charging, older models still rely on power cords to transmit power to the mobile device. The problem with this setup is that the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. This setup is easily exploitable, and trust opportunists to do just that. When you use a public cable, they gain user access by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code into your device.

Attacks can be an invasion of privacy: your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk, and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious computer. The computer can then access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly anytime.

But attacks can also be in the form of malicious code directly injected into your phone. A public USB hub can be used to transmit malware-ridden programs or tracking applications to the user’s mobile phone. All it takes is one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you are not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone has juice.
  • Carry a personal charger. Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely from a power outlet or on the go using a power bank.
  • If possible, carry a backup battery. If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a spare battery if your device has a removable battery, or a battery case (a phone case that doubles as a battery).
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code, fingerprint scan, or face ID, your phone cannot be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission. They will charge your device, but data transfer is impossible.

Technology threats are all around us. Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone at a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device.

Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.

Posted in General Articles C, Security | Tagged , , , , | Comments closed

What you need to know about juice jacking

We’ve come to rely on our smartphones to help complete daily tasks, and this has resulted in the need to recharge our phones multiple times a day. But when you’re far from your charger, public charging kiosks can seem like a good substitute. However, this can lead to an incident of “juice jacking.” If this is news to you, find out what juice jacking is and how you can avoid it.

What’s juice jacking?

While newer phones have ditched the cable charger and moved on to wireless charging, older models still rely on power cords to transmit power to the mobile device. The problem with this setup is that the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. This setup is easily exploitable, and trust opportunists to do just that. When you use a public cable, they gain user access by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code into your device.

Attacks can be an invasion of privacy: your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk, and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious computer. The computer can then access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly anytime.

But attacks can also be in the form of malicious code directly injected into your phone. A public USB hub can be used to transmit malware-ridden programs or tracking applications to the user’s mobile phone. All it takes is one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you are not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone has juice.
  • Carry a personal charger. Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely from a power outlet or on the go using a power bank.
  • If possible, carry a backup battery. If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a spare battery if your device has a removable battery, or a battery case (a phone case that doubles as a battery).
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code, fingerprint scan, or face ID, your phone cannot be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission. They will charge your device, but data transfer is impossible.

Technology threats are all around us. Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone at a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device.

Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.

Posted in General Articles B, Security | Tagged , , , , | Comments closed

A complete guide to juice jacking

Smartphones have become such a vital component of the modern lifestyle to the point that we are always glued to them. And as our time with our gadgets increases, the need to recharge them while we’re on the go also increases. When you’re nowhere near your charger and your juice runs out, that public charging kiosk can look pretty promising. But what you might not know is that recharging phones through public chargers can make you a victim of “juice jacking.” If you’re not sure what that is, read on to find out what makes it dangerous.

What’s juice jacking?

While newer phones have ditched the cable charger and moved on to wireless charging, older models still rely on power cords to transmit power to the mobile device. The problem with this setup is that the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. This setup is easily exploitable, and trust opportunists to do just that. When you use a public cable, they gain user access by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code into your device.

Attacks can be an invasion of privacy: your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk, and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious computer. The computer can then access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly anytime.

But attacks can also be in the form of malicious code directly injected into your phone. A public USB hub can be used to transmit malware-ridden programs or tracking applications to the user’s mobile phone. All it takes is one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you are not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone has juice.
  • Carry a personal charger. Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely from a power outlet or on the go using a power bank.
  • If possible, carry a backup battery. If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a spare battery if your device has a removable battery, or a battery case (a phone case that doubles as a battery).
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code, fingerprint scan, or face ID, your phone cannot be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission. They will charge your device, but data transfer is impossible.

Technology threats are all around us. Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone at a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device.

Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.

Posted in General Articles A, Security | Tagged , , , , | Comments closed

Practical Android tips for business users

The tablet is easily one of the most indispensable devices for many business managers and owners. These highly mobile devices allow you to stay in touch with the office and also work without lugging around a heavy or bulky laptop. Because of this, many businesses are looking to integrate tablets, especially Android tablets. Here are some do’s and don’ts when using Android in the office.

Do:

  • Use separate profiles – Recent versions of Android allow you to set up multiple accounts on one device. This means you can have a personal account and a work account on the same device without the two crossing over. Each account can be protected with a unique password and has its own apps and layout, an ideal setup for staff who use their personal devices for work.
  • Pick responsibly – Android tablets come in all shapes and sizes, and with different versions of the operating system. That’s why it’s a good idea to do some research before you buy one for your business. Take the time to try and identify what you will be using the device for, what features you would like, and most importantly, if the device is compatible with your existing systems. We strongly recommend going with one of the big-name brands like Google, Samsung, or Asus.
  • Develop a usage and management plan – Before you integrate the device into your system, plan ahead for how the device will be used and managed. Will each employee be in charge of managing their own device, or will your IT partner manage the devices for you? Develop a list of approved apps for work, including important ones like email and messaging. Then, make sure employees are trained to use these business apps properly and securely.
  • Look into accessories – One common factor many businesses forget to look into when implementing Android devices is the numerous accessories available for tablets. In order to extend the life of the devices, it is a good idea to get protective cases and screen covers. Also, look and see whether or not the device you have chosen has a removable battery or SD card. If it does, you may want to invest in extra batteries and cards.

Don’t:

  • Skimp on security – As Android tablets become more popular, they become more attractive targets for cybercriminals. You must mandate security measures on all devices. This includes an antivirus scanner and daily check for app updates. Also, educate staff on how to spot fake apps, how to enable secure browsing on the web, and why they should avoid unsecured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Allow third-party app stores – Android is an open-source operating system, meaning you can install apps from almost any location. This has resulted in many third-party app stores (stores not run by Google) popping up. Some of these stores host a wide array of apps, including ones that may contain malware. To keep your business safe, prevent employees from installing apps from third-party stores, and only allow apps that have been thoroughly vetted on Google Play.
  • Worry about fragmentation – Yes, Android is very fragmented — devices are running different versions of Android. While this may seem like a big deal, it doesn’t have to be. We recommend limiting your tablet purchase to those with the most recent version of Android. Once you get used to the tablet, the issue of fragmentation will usually disappear, especially if everyone in the office is on the same version.

If you are looking for help in selecting and managing an Android device for your office, contact us today. We have a team of Android experts who can support you at any time.

Posted in Android, General Articles C | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Optimizing your Android tablet experience

More businesses are relying on Android tablets, especially those with staff who are mobile or away from the office. However, there are many business owners and managers who have trouble managing these Android devices. So, to help, we have created a brief guide on the do’s and don’ts of using your Android tablet at the office.

Do:

  • Use separate profiles – Recent versions of Android allow you to set up multiple accounts on one device. This means you can have a personal account and a work account on the same device without the two crossing over. Each account can be protected with a unique password and has its own apps and layout, an ideal setup for staff who use their personal devices for work.
  • Pick responsibly – Android tablets come in all shapes and sizes, and with different versions of the operating system. That’s why it’s a good idea to do some research before you buy one for your business. Take the time to try and identify what you will be using the device for, what features you would like, and most importantly, if the device is compatible with your existing systems. We strongly recommend going with one of the big-name brands like Google, Samsung, or Asus.
  • Develop a usage and management plan – Before you integrate the device into your system, plan ahead for how the device will be used and managed. Will each employee be in charge of managing their own device, or will your IT partner manage the devices for you? Develop a list of approved apps for work, including important ones like email and messaging. Then, make sure employees are trained to use these business apps properly and securely.
  • Look into accessories – One common factor many businesses forget to look into when implementing Android devices is the numerous accessories available for tablets. In order to extend the life of the devices, it is a good idea to get protective cases and screen covers. Also, look and see whether or not the device you have chosen has a removable battery or SD card. If it does, you may want to invest in extra batteries and cards.

Don’t:

  • Skimp on security – As Android tablets become more popular, they become more attractive targets for cybercriminals. You must mandate security measures on all devices. This includes an antivirus scanner and daily check for app updates. Also, educate staff on how to spot fake apps, how to enable secure browsing on the web, and why they should avoid unsecured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Allow third-party app stores – Android is an open-source operating system, meaning you can install apps from almost any location. This has resulted in many third-party app stores (stores not run by Google) popping up. Some of these stores host a wide array of apps, including ones that may contain malware. To keep your business safe, prevent employees from installing apps from third-party stores, and only allow apps that have been thoroughly vetted on Google Play.
  • Worry about fragmentation – Yes, Android is very fragmented — devices are running different versions of Android. While this may seem like a big deal, it doesn’t have to be. We recommend limiting your tablet purchase to those with the most recent version of Android. Once you get used to the tablet, the issue of fragmentation will usually disappear, especially if everyone in the office is on the same version.

If you are looking for help in selecting and managing an Android device for your office, contact us today. We have a team of Android experts who can support you at any time.

Posted in Android, General Articles B | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Android tablets do’s and don’ts

Going mobile is a standard strategy for businesses today. With the heavy adoption of devices like Android tablets, business owners are able to connect with the office from nearly anywhere. This is great news and one of the mains reasons why so many businesses are thinking about integrating Android tablets at work. For those who are, here is a brief guide on some do’s and don’ts for Android in the office.

Do:

  • Use separate profiles – Recent versions of Android allow you to set up multiple accounts on one device. This means you can have a personal account and a work account on the same device without the two crossing over. Each account can be protected with a unique password and has its own apps and layout, an ideal setup for staff who use their personal devices for work.
  • Pick responsibly – Android tablets come in all shapes and sizes, and with different versions of the operating system. That’s why it’s a good idea to do some research before you buy one for your business. Take the time to try and identify what you will be using the device for, what features you would like, and most importantly, if the device is compatible with your existing systems. We strongly recommend going with one of the big-name brands like Google, Samsung, or Asus.
  • Develop a usage and management plan – Before you integrate the device into your system, plan ahead for how the device will be used and managed. Will each employee be in charge of managing their own device, or will your IT partner manage the devices for you? Develop a list of approved apps for work, including important ones like email and messaging. Then, make sure employees are trained to use these business apps properly and securely.
  • Look into accessories – One common factor many businesses forget to look into when implementing Android devices is the numerous accessories available for tablets. In order to extend the life of the devices, it is a good idea to get protective cases and screen covers. Also, look and see whether or not the device you have chosen has a removable battery or SD card. If it does, you may want to invest in extra batteries and cards.

Don’t:

  • Skimp on security – As Android tablets become more popular, they become more attractive targets for cybercriminals. You must mandate security measures on all devices. This includes an antivirus scanner and daily check for app updates. Also, educate staff on how to spot fake apps, how to enable secure browsing on the web, and why they should avoid unsecured public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Allow third-party app stores – Android is an open-source operating system, meaning you can install apps from almost any location. This has resulted in many third-party app stores (stores not run by Google) popping up. Some of these stores host a wide array of apps, including ones that may contain malware. To keep your business safe, prevent employees from installing apps from third-party stores, and only allow apps that have been thoroughly vetted on Google Play.
  • Worry about fragmentation – Yes, Android is very fragmented — devices are running different versions of Android. While this may seem like a big deal, it doesn’t have to be. We recommend limiting your tablet purchase to those with the most recent version of Android. Once you get used to the tablet, the issue of fragmentation will usually disappear, especially if everyone in the office is on the same version.

If you are looking for help in selecting and managing an Android device for your office, contact us today. We have a team of Android experts who can support you at any time.

Posted in Android, General Articles A | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Virtualization: 10 Critical terms

Virtualization is the act of moving a physical component or bit of software from a physical environment to a digital one that’s normally delivered over a network. This technology has become one of the most sought after tech improvements of the past decade, especially among small- to medium-sized businesses (SMBs). The only problem is, virtualization can be complicated, not to mention confusing because of its esoteric terminology. To make things easier, check out this glossary of 10 common virtualization terms.

1. Virtual machine (VM)

You will often hear virtualization experts discuss the term VM. What they are talking about is the virtual machine. VMs are essentially virtual representations of the computer on your desk. They can do everything a physical machine does, only everything is virtual and usually delivered over a network connection.

Because VMs are software-based, you can often run more than one VM on the same physical machine. This could be two separate versions of Windows running at the same time, or even running a different operating system (OS), say Windows on your MacBook.

2. Virtual server

A virtual server is a specific type of VM running in a virtual environment. A common setup many offices use is to have one physical server on-site. This server hosts separate virtual servers that, in turn, host different services like email, networking, and storage, among others.

Other businesses choose to rely completely on virtual servers. This is where another company hosts the servers delivered to you over the internet. This way, virtual servers appear to be present on the network just like physical ones.

3. Virtual desktop

Much like the virtual server, the virtual desktop is a specific type of VM. In this case, it is a virtually delivered version of an operating system like Windows, Linux, or even macOS.

Since the advent of virtual desktops, the idea that companies have to limit a machine to its OS has become irrelevant. For example, if you own a Mac and need to access a Windows-based program, you could set up a virtual desktop that runs Windows.

4. Hypervisor

The hypervisor is essentially a small OS that enables virtualization. It takes physical hardware resources and combines them into a platform delivered virtually to one or many users.

5. Host system

The host system, also referred to as the parent, is where the physical hardware and software are installed. These physical components are then copied by the hypervisor and delivered in a virtual state to the user. If you are creating a virtual desktop environment, then the host system will have the desktop’s OS installed on it, along with the necessary software.

6. Guest system

The guest system, also referred to as the child, is where the VM is accessed. From the example above, the OS installed on the host machine is replicated by the hypervisor and the copy is then delivered to the user.

The user can interact with the OS just as they would with the physical host machine, because the guest system is an exact copy of the host. The guest machine, in contrast, is virtual instead of physical.

7. Virtual Infrastructure

By combining a bunch of different types of VMs together into one solution such as hardware, storage, desktops, and servers, a virtual infrastructure is formed.

This is ideal for organizations looking for an entirely virtualized solution. In this setup, the whole IT infrastructure is virtualized and combined into one solution. Many companies look for a solution like this because it reduces the need for on-premises hardware, while making it easier for an IT partner to manage.

8. P2V

P2V, or physical-to-virtual, refers to the act of migrating a physical system to a virtual one. A common example is the merging of physical servers into a virtual environment hosted on one server.

9. Snapshot

A snapshot is an image of the state of the virtual machine at a specific point of time. This includes all of the data, configurations, and even windows or programs open at that certain moment. Snapshots are like the save button on video games — they save your progress. When you next load up the VM, your data, programs, and configurations will be right where you left them.

Snapshots are also kept in case something goes wrong with the VM. Then, you can easily revert back to an older snapshot, one that was taken before the problem occurred.

10. Clone

The action of taking one VM and creating an exact copy that can be used by another computer or user.

If you are looking to learn more about virtualization, contact us today to see how we can help.

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