Windows 10 updates for Fall 2017

Windows 10’s Fall Creators Update is the next major update that Microsoft will roll out in September. Besides reusing the same “Creators Update” name and focusing on bringing the Windows experience to iOS and Android devices, here are some noteworthy features users can expect.

Timeline
It’s designed to grant Windows 10 users freedom to switch between multiple devices, including iOS and Android phones. Timeline lets you pick up from where you left off if you’re switching between multiple Windows 10 devices. With the Cortana integration, this will even extend to some Microsoft apps on iOS and Android. This useful new feature will be accessible via Window 10’s Task View.

OneDrive Files on Demand
This feature allows you to access all your cloud-based files without having to download them in order to optimize your device’s storage space. What’s more, you won’t have to change the way you work, because all your files — even those online — can be seen in File Explorer, and they work just like every other file on your device.

Cloud clipboard
The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update brings a cloud-powered clipboard that lets you copy information from one Windows 10 device and paste it onto another. And this isn’t limited to text alone either. On top of that, it supports Android and iOS devices if you use Microsoft’s SwiftKey virtual keyboard.

Pick up where you left off
As the name suggests, it basically allows you to start working on your PC and continue working on your phone when you are away from your PC (and vice-versa). Currently, the feature works only between Windows 10 PCs in the Windows 10 Creators Update — but with the upcoming Fall Creators Update for Windows 10, Microsoft will be integrating this capability into your phones as well.

My People
It was originally announced as a key feature in the April’s Creator Update, but will be launched in the coming Fall Creators Update. This feature lets you pin a number of connections to your taskbar — three, in the current Insider preview — and stay in constant touch with them. It defaults to Skype, but you can choose an alternative if you’d like.

These are just a handful of the nifty features users can expect from Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. For more information, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re more than happy to help.

We’ll keep you updated on the latest developments.

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What’s on tap for Windows 10 this fall?

This autumn, the changing leaves are accompanied by the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update from Microsoft. Not only is it retaining the “Creators Update” name, this version will reportedly focus more on bringing the Windows experience to iOS and Android devices as well. Here are some of the fresh features you’ll find in the upcoming Windows 10 iteration.

Timeline
It’s designed to grant Windows 10 users freedom to switch between multiple devices, including iOS and Android phones. Timeline lets you pick up from where you left off if you’re switching between multiple Windows 10 devices. With the Cortana integration, this will even extend to some Microsoft apps on iOS and Android. This useful new feature will be accessible via Window 10’s Task View.

OneDrive Files on Demand
This feature allows you to access all your cloud-based files without having to download them in order to optimize your device’s storage space. What’s more, you won’t have to change the way you work, because all your files — even those online — can be seen in File Explorer, and they work just like every other file on your device.

Cloud clipboard
The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update brings a cloud-powered clipboard that lets you copy information from one Windows 10 device and paste it onto another. And this isn’t limited to text alone either. On top of that, it supports Android and iOS devices if you use Microsoft’s SwiftKey virtual keyboard.

Pick up where you left off
As the name suggests, it basically allows you to start working on your PC and continue working on your phone when you are away from your PC (and vice-versa). Currently, the feature works only between Windows 10 PCs in the Windows 10 Creators Update — but with the upcoming Fall Creators Update for Windows 10, Microsoft will be integrating this capability into your phones as well.

My People
It was originally announced as a key feature in the April’s Creator Update, but will be launched in the coming Fall Creators Update. This feature lets you pin a number of connections to your taskbar — three, in the current Insider preview — and stay in constant touch with them. It defaults to Skype, but you can choose an alternative if you’d like.

These are just a handful of the nifty features users can expect from Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. For more information, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re more than happy to help.

We’ll keep you updated on the latest developments.

Posted in General Articles C, Windows | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Windows 10’s new Fall Creators features

The feature-packed Windows Creators Update might not have made its way into every PC yet, but Microsoft wasted no time in announcing its successor! The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update was announced at the Build 2017 conference and is expected to hit most Windows 10 PCs (including Windows 10 S devices) by September. Take a closer look at some of its nifty features.

Timeline
It’s designed to grant Windows 10 users freedom to switch between multiple devices, including iOS and Android phones. Timeline lets you pick up from where you left off if you’re switching between multiple Windows 10 devices. With the Cortana integration, this will even extend to some Microsoft apps on iOS and Android. This useful new feature will be accessible via Window 10’s Task View.

OneDrive Files on Demand
This feature allows you to access all your cloud-based files without having to download them in order to optimize your device’s storage space. What’s more, you won’t have to change the way you work, because all your files — even those online — can be seen in File Explorer, and they work just like every other file on your device.

Cloud clipboard
The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update brings a cloud-powered clipboard that lets you copy information from one Windows 10 device and paste it onto another. And this isn’t limited to text alone either. On top of that, it supports Android and iOS devices if you use Microsoft’s SwiftKey virtual keyboard.

Pick up where you left off
As the name suggests, it basically allows you to start working on your PC and continue working on your phone when you are away from your PC (and vice-versa). Currently, the feature works only between Windows 10 PCs in the Windows 10 Creators Update — but with the upcoming Fall Creators Update for Windows 10, Microsoft will be integrating this capability into your phones as well.

My People
It was originally announced as a key feature in the April’s Creator Update, but will be launched in the coming Fall Creators Update. This feature lets you pin a number of connections to your taskbar — three, in the current Insider preview — and stay in constant touch with them. It defaults to Skype, but you can choose an alternative if you’d like.

These are just a handful of the nifty features users can expect from Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. For more information, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re more than happy to help.

We’ll keep you updated on the latest developments.

Posted in General Articles B, Windows | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

WannaCry: A historic cyberattack

No one can escape the news of WannaCry. The IT industry has been covering this type of malware for years, but never has one campaign spread so far or infected so many computers. Read on to gain a greater understanding of what happened and how to prepare yourself for the inevitable copy cats.

Ransomware review

Ransomware is a specific type of malware program that either encrypts or steals valuable data and threatens to erase it or release it publicly unless a ransom is paid. We’ve been writing about this terrifying threat for years, but the true genesis of ransomware dates all the way back to 1989.

This form of digital extortion has enjoyed peaks and troughs in popularity since then, but never has it been as dangerous as it is now. In 2015, the FBI reported a huge spike in the popularity of ransomware, and healthcare providers became common targets because of the private and time-sensitive nature of their hosted data.

The trend got even worse, and by the end of 2016 ransomware had become a $1 billion-a-year industry.

The WannaCry ransomware

Although the vast majority of ransomware programs rely on convincing users to click compromised links in emails, the WannaCry version seems to have spread via more technical security gaps. It’s still too early to be sure, but the security experts at Malwarebytes Labs believe that the reports of WannaCry being transmitted through phishing emails is simply a matter of confusion. Thousands of other ransomware versions are spread through spam email every day and distinguishing them can be difficult.

By combining a Windows vulnerability recently leaked from the National Security Agency’s cyber arsenal and some simple programming to hunt down servers that interact with public networks, WannaCry spread itself further than any malware campaign has in the last 15 years.

Despite infecting more than 200,000 computers in at least 150 countries, the cyberattackers have only made a fraction of what you would expect. Victims must pay the ransom in Bitcoins, a totally untraceable currency traded online. Inherent to the Bitcoin platform is a public ledger, meaning anyone can see that WannaCry’s coffers have collected a measly 1% of its victims payments.

How to protect yourself for what comes next

Part of the reason this ransomware failed to scare users into paying up is because it was so poorly made. Within a day of its release, the self-propagating portion of its programming was brought to a halt by an individual unsure of why it included a 42-character URL that led to an unregistered domain. Once he registered the web address for himself, WannaCry stopped spreading.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t help the thousands that were already infected. And it definitely doesn’t give you an excuse to ignore what cybersecurity experts are saying, “This is only the beginning.” WannaCry was so poorly written, it’s amazing it made it as far as it did. And considering it would’ve made hundreds of millions of dollars if it was created by more capable programmers, your organization needs to prepare for the next global cyberattack.

Every single day it should be your goal to complete the following:

  • Thorough reviews of reports from basic perimeter security solutions. Antivirus software, hardware firewalls, and intrusion prevention systems log hundreds of amateur attempts on your network security every day; critical vulnerabilities can be gleaned from these documents.
  • Check for updates and security patches for every single piece of software in your office, from accounting apps to operating systems. Computers with the latest updates from Microsoft were totally safe from WannaCry, which should be motivation to never again click “Remind me later.”
  • Social engineering and phishing may not have been factors this time around, but training employees to recognize suspicious links is a surefire strategy for avoiding the thousands of other malware strains that threaten your business.

Revisiting these strategies every single day may seem a bit much, but we’ve been in the industry long enough to know that it takes only one mistake to bring your operations to a halt. For daily monitoring and support, plus industry-leading cybersecurity advice, call us today.

Posted in General Articles A, Security | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Lessons learned from the WannaCry malware

WannaCry is one of the few malware campaigns to become a household name. It’s educated countless people on the reality of ransomware and the vulnerability of their data. If you’re still worried about whether you’re at risk, we’ve collected everything you need to know right here.

Ransomware review

Ransomware is a specific type of malware program that either encrypts or steals valuable data and threatens to erase it or release it publicly unless a ransom is paid. We’ve been writing about this terrifying threat for years, but the true genesis of ransomware dates all the way back to 1989.

This form of digital extortion has enjoyed peaks and troughs in popularity since then, but never has it been as dangerous as it is now. In 2015, the FBI reported a huge spike in the popularity of ransomware, and healthcare providers became common targets because of the private and time-sensitive nature of their hosted data.

The trend got even worse, and by the end of 2016 ransomware had become a $1 billion-a-year industry.

The WannaCry ransomware

Although the vast majority of ransomware programs rely on convincing users to click compromised links in emails, the WannaCry version seems to have spread via more technical security gaps. It’s still too early to be sure, but the security experts at Malwarebytes Labs believe that the reports of WannaCry being transmitted through phishing emails is simply a matter of confusion. Thousands of other ransomware versions are spread through spam email every day and distinguishing them can be difficult.

By combining a Windows vulnerability recently leaked from the National Security Agency’s cyber arsenal and some simple programming to hunt down servers that interact with public networks, WannaCry spread itself further than any malware campaign has in the last 15 years.

Despite infecting more than 200,000 computers in at least 150 countries, the cyberattackers have only made a fraction of what you would expect. Victims must pay the ransom in Bitcoins, a totally untraceable currency traded online. Inherent to the Bitcoin platform is a public ledger, meaning anyone can see that WannaCry’s coffers have collected a measly 1% of its victims payments.

How to protect yourself for what comes next

Part of the reason this ransomware failed to scare users into paying up is because it was so poorly made. Within a day of its release, the self-propagating portion of its programming was brought to a halt by an individual unsure of why it included a 42-character URL that led to an unregistered domain. Once he registered the web address for himself, WannaCry stopped spreading.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t help the thousands that were already infected. And it definitely doesn’t give you an excuse to ignore what cybersecurity experts are saying, “This is only the beginning.” WannaCry was so poorly written, it’s amazing it made it as far as it did. And considering it would’ve made hundreds of millions of dollars if it was created by more capable programmers, your organization needs to prepare for the next global cyberattack.

Every single day it should be your goal to complete the following:

  • Thorough reviews of reports from basic perimeter security solutions. Antivirus software, hardware firewalls, and intrusion prevention systems log hundreds of amateur attempts on your network security every day; critical vulnerabilities can be gleaned from these documents.
  • Check for updates and security patches for every single piece of software in your office, from accounting apps to operating systems. Computers with the latest updates from Microsoft were totally safe from WannaCry, which should be motivation to never again click “Remind me later.”
  • Social engineering and phishing may not have been factors this time around, but training employees to recognize suspicious links is a surefire strategy for avoiding the thousands of other malware strains that threaten your business.

Revisiting these strategies every single day may seem a bit much, but we’ve been in the industry long enough to know that it takes only one mistake to bring your operations to a halt. For daily monitoring and support, plus industry-leading cybersecurity advice, call us today.

Posted in General Articles C, Security | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

How did WannaCry spread so far?

By now, you must have heard of the WannaCry ransomware. It ranks as one of the most effective pieces of malware in the internet’s history, and it has everyone worried about what’s coming next. To guard yourself, the best place to start is with a better understanding of what made WannaCry different.

Ransomware review

Ransomware is a specific type of malware program that either encrypts or steals valuable data and threatens to erase it or release it publicly unless a ransom is paid. We’ve been writing about this terrifying threat for years, but the true genesis of ransomware dates all the way back to 1989.

This form of digital extortion has enjoyed peaks and troughs in popularity since then, but never has it been as dangerous as it is now. In 2015, the FBI reported a huge spike in the popularity of ransomware, and healthcare providers became common targets because of the private and time-sensitive nature of their hosted data.

The trend got even worse, and by the end of 2016 ransomware had become a $1 billion-a-year industry.

The WannaCry ransomware

Although the vast majority of ransomware programs rely on convincing users to click compromised links in emails, the WannaCry version seems to have spread via more technical security gaps. It’s still too early to be sure, but the security experts at Malwarebytes Labs believe that the reports of WannaCry being transmitted through phishing emails is simply a matter of confusion. Thousands of other ransomware versions are spread through spam email every day and distinguishing them can be difficult.

By combining a Windows vulnerability recently leaked from the National Security Agency’s cyber arsenal and some simple programming to hunt down servers that interact with public networks, WannaCry spread itself further than any malware campaign has in the last 15 years.

Despite infecting more than 200,000 computers in at least 150 countries, the cyberattackers have only made a fraction of what you would expect. Victims must pay the ransom in Bitcoins, a totally untraceable currency traded online. Inherent to the Bitcoin platform is a public ledger, meaning anyone can see that WannaCry’s coffers have collected a measly 1% of its victims payments.

How to protect yourself for what comes next

Part of the reason this ransomware failed to scare users into paying up is because it was so poorly made. Within a day of its release, the self-propagating portion of its programming was brought to a halt by an individual unsure of why it included a 42-character URL that led to an unregistered domain. Once he registered the web address for himself, WannaCry stopped spreading.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t help the thousands that were already infected. And it definitely doesn’t give you an excuse to ignore what cybersecurity experts are saying, “This is only the beginning.” WannaCry was so poorly written, it’s amazing it made it as far as it did. And considering it would’ve made hundreds of millions of dollars if it was created by more capable programmers, your organization needs to prepare for the next global cyberattack.

Every single day it should be your goal to complete the following:

  • Thorough reviews of reports from basic perimeter security solutions. Antivirus software, hardware firewalls, and intrusion prevention systems log hundreds of amateur attempts on your network security every day; critical vulnerabilities can be gleaned from these documents.
  • Check for updates and security patches for every single piece of software in your office, from accounting apps to operating systems. Computers with the latest updates from Microsoft were totally safe from WannaCry, which should be motivation to never again click “Remind me later.”
  • Social engineering and phishing may not have been factors this time around, but training employees to recognize suspicious links is a surefire strategy for avoiding the thousands of other malware strains that threaten your business.

Revisiting these strategies every single day may seem a bit much, but we’ve been in the industry long enough to know that it takes only one mistake to bring your operations to a halt. For daily monitoring and support, plus industry-leading cybersecurity advice, call us today.

Posted in General Articles B, Security | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Malware infects Mac HandBrake downloads

From May 2-6, a Trojan was attached to downloads of the macOS version of HandBreak, a free, cross-platform video transcoding software that processes multimedia files and other digital sources such as DVD and BluRay into .MP4 and .MKV files, and other formats. If you’re not sure whether your device has been infected, read on.

How to know if your device was infected

HandBrake can be downloaded from its official website and via mirror sites, or sites that provide the same content as the primary site. Infected downloads came from the mirror site, download.handbrake.fr, where the installer file (HandBrake-1.0.7.dmg) was swapped with a Trojan file, OSX.PROTON. This malicious file managed to trick Apple’s security approval system into deeming it as safe and legitimate.

One way to find out whether you’ve downloaded the Trojan is to look for an “activity_agent” process in the macOS by accessing the Activity Monitor application. Another way is by checking whether the installer file’s checksums match HandBreak’s public codes. You can do this by comparing your downloaded file’s codes with the ones found on HandBreak’s checksums page. If they don’t match, that means you’ve downloaded an infected installer file. This all might sound like a lot of tech gobbledygook, but these checks are essential to knowing whether or not your system has been infected.

The damage

The OSX.PROTON is considered one of the nastiest Trojans today because it can spy on computers from a remote location. It can monitor your activities, upload malicious files on your computer, steal your password and confidential information by detecting keystrokes or taking screenshots, and take over your entire system by hacking your admin settings.

Downloading an innocuous video transcoding application is not typically considered dangerous. However, downloading apps from unofficial sources definitely poses considerable risks. In such a scenario, a backed up data can save your malware-infected computer.

Precautionary measures

Fortunately, Apple has taken steps to block further infections by releasing an update. If your system has been infected, however, it’s not too late. Follow HandBreak’s suggested steps in removing infected files to mitigate any damage. You should also take additional security measures such as changing passwords from a different device. Better yet, get professional help from IT security experts.

Every time you download an app from an unauthorized source, know that there are risks. If you’re a Mac user, download apps only from the Apple Store; and for Android users, only from the Google Play Store. And to gauge the safety of the apps you want to download, it always helps to read their reviews beforehand.

The HandBreak macOS malware is just one of many that are attacking vulnerable systems. With the help of our network security experts, you can thwart cyber attackers’ attempts to steal your sensitive data, hold your files for ransom, or spy on your online activities. Call us now so we can recommend suitable protections.

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Trojan infects macOS version of HandBrake

If you’ve downloaded the macOS version of HandBreak, a popular video transcoding program that converts multimedia files into different formats, checking your computer’s safety right now would be wise. Users who downloaded the program between May 2 and May 6 have a 50 percent chance of being infected with an Apple Trojan, based on an announcement on HandBrake’s website. Here’s everything you need to know.

How to know if your device was infected

HandBrake can be downloaded from its official website and via mirror sites, or sites that provide the same content as the primary site. Infected downloads came from the mirror site, download.handbrake.fr, where the installer file (HandBrake-1.0.7.dmg) was swapped with a Trojan file, OSX.PROTON. This malicious file managed to trick Apple’s security approval system into deeming it as safe and legitimate.

One way to find out whether you’ve downloaded the Trojan is to look for an “activity_agent” process in the macOS by accessing the Activity Monitor application. Another way is by checking whether the installer file’s checksums match HandBreak’s public codes. You can do this by comparing your downloaded file’s codes with the ones found on HandBreak’s checksums page. If they don’t match, that means you’ve downloaded an infected installer file. This all might sound like a lot of tech gobbledygook, but these checks are essential to knowing whether or not your system has been infected.

The damage

The OSX.PROTON is considered one of the nastiest Trojans today because it can spy on computers from a remote location. It can monitor your activities, upload malicious files on your computer, steal your password and confidential information by detecting keystrokes or taking screenshots, and take over your entire system by hacking your admin settings.

Downloading an innocuous video transcoding application is not typically considered dangerous. However, downloading apps from unofficial sources definitely poses considerable risks. In such a scenario, a backed up data can save your malware-infected computer.

Precautionary measures

Fortunately, Apple has taken steps to block further infections by releasing an update. If your system has been infected, however, it’s not too late. Follow HandBreak’s suggested steps in removing infected files to mitigate any damage. You should also take additional security measures such as changing passwords from a different device. Better yet, get professional help from IT security experts.

Every time you download an app from an unauthorized source, know that there are risks. If you’re a Mac user, download apps only from the Apple Store; and for Android users, only from the Google Play Store. And to gauge the safety of the apps you want to download, it always helps to read their reviews beforehand.

The HandBreak macOS malware is just one of many that are attacking vulnerable systems. With the help of our network security experts, you can thwart cyber attackers’ attempts to steal your sensitive data, hold your files for ransom, or spy on your online activities. Call us now so we can recommend suitable protections.

Posted in Apple, General Articles B | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Mac HandBreak downloads infected by Trojan

macOS version of HandBrake, an open-source video transcoding software that converts multimedia files into various formats, was recently infected with a Trojan. According to HandBreak’s announcement, if you downloaded the app between May 2 (14:30 UTC) and May 6 (11:00 UTC), there’s a 50% chance that your system got infected. Read on to find out more.

How to know if your device was infected

HandBrake can be downloaded from its official website and via mirror sites, or sites that provide the same content as the primary site. Infected downloads came from the mirror site, download.handbrake.fr, where the installer file (HandBrake-1.0.7.dmg) was swapped with a Trojan file, OSX.PROTON. This malicious file managed to trick Apple’s security approval system into deeming it as safe and legitimate.

One way to find out whether you’ve downloaded the Trojan is to look for an “activity_agent” process in the macOS by accessing the Activity Monitor application. Another way is by checking whether the installer file’s checksums match HandBreak’s public codes. You can do this by comparing your downloaded file’s codes with the ones found on HandBreak’s checksums page. If they don’t match, that means you’ve downloaded an infected installer file. This all might sound like a lot of tech gobbledygook, but these checks are essential to knowing whether or not your system has been infected.

The damage

The OSX.PROTON is considered one of the nastiest Trojans today because it can spy on computers from a remote location. It can monitor your activities, upload malicious files on your computer, steal your password and confidential information by detecting keystrokes or taking screenshots, and take over your entire system by hacking your admin settings.

Downloading an innocuous video transcoding application is not typically considered dangerous. However, downloading apps from unofficial sources definitely poses considerable risks. In such a scenario, a backed up data can save your malware-infected computer.

Precautionary measures

Fortunately, Apple has taken steps to block further infections by releasing an update. If your system has been infected, however, it’s not too late. Follow HandBreak’s suggested steps in removing infected files to mitigate any damage. You should also take additional security measures such as changing passwords from a different device. Better yet, get professional help from IT security experts.

Every time you download an app from an unauthorized source, know that there are risks. If you’re a Mac user, download apps only from the Apple Store; and for Android users, only from the Google Play Store. And to gauge the safety of the apps you want to download, it always helps to read their reviews beforehand.

The HandBreak macOS malware is just one of many that are attacking vulnerable systems. With the help of our network security experts, you can thwart cyber attackers’ attempts to steal your sensitive data, hold your files for ransom, or spy on your online activities. Call us now so we can recommend suitable protections.

Posted in Apple, General Articles A | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Precautions against WannaCry ransomware

The WannaCry ransomware, a type of malware that encrypts a victim’s files and extorts them for money, has already affected thousands of machines worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of this attack is just the beginning. According to security researchers, other hackers will probably develop stronger WannaCry variants in the coming months. And if you don’t want your business to become a victim of these attacks, you must take the following precautions.

Update your software
The first (and probably best) defense against WannaCry ransomware is to update your operating system. New research from Kaspersky shows that machines running Windows XP, 7 and outdated Windows 10 versions were affected by the ransomware. To check whether your systems are up to date, open your Windows search bar, look for Windows Update, click Check for Updates, and install any major updates.

Also, don’t forget to download the latest security patches for your business applications and security software.

Run security programs
Many antivirus programs now have mechanisms for detecting and blocking WannaCry malware; so when you’ve fully updated your security software, run a full system scan.

Keep in mind that antivirus isn’t a foolproof security solution. Instead, run it alongside other security applications like intrusion prevention systems and firewalls.

Use data backup and recovery tools
If WannaCry does infect your computers, only a solid data backup and recovery solution can save your business. Before ransomware strikes, periodically back up your files in both an external hard drive and a cloud-based backup service.

External hard drives will serve as your local backup solution for quick recovery times. However, we recommend keeping the external drive disconnected when it’s not being used and plugging it in only when you need to back up files at the end of the day. This is because when ransomware infects a computer, it will usually look to encrypt local backup drives as well.

Cloud-based backups, on the other hand, allow you to store files in remote data centers and access them from any internet-enabled device. When selecting a cloud services provider, make sure they provide the appropriate cloud protections to your files. For example, your backup vendor should provide reporting tools to keep track of any anomalies in your files. Document versioning features are also important. This allows you to recover older versions of a document in case the current version is encrypted.

After your local and cloud backups are set up, perform regular tests to ensure your disaster recovery plan works.

Stay informed
Finally, it’s important to stay on guard at all times. WannaCry is just one of many ransomware strains affecting businesses today, and in order to stay safe you need to be constantly up to date on the latest cybersecurity- and business continuity-related news.

For more ransomware prevention tips and services, call us today. We’ll make sure hackers don’t hold your business hostage.

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