Predictive analytics: 3 Components

BI_Sep08_AIn business, as in life, we constantly try to make predictions about the future. How will sales be next year if we implement a new procedure? What will the weather be like for the annual staff event next week? It’s no surprise then that businesses of all sizes have started to embrace the idea of predictive analytics. However, many business managers are unsure as to exactly how to work with this form of analytics effectively. To help, here is an overview of the three main components of predictive analysis all business owners and managers should be aware of.

Together, these three elements of predictive analytics enables data scientists and even managers to conduct and analyze forecasts and predictions.

Component 1: data

As with most business processes, data is one of the most important and vital components. Without data you won’t be able to make predictions and the decisions necessary to reach desired outcomes. In other words, data is the foundation of predictive analytics.

If you want predictive analytics to be successful, you need not only the right kind of data but information that is useful in helping answer the main question you are trying to predict or forecast. You need to to collect as much relevant data as possible in relation to what you are trying to predict. This means tracking past data, customers, demographics, and more.

Merely tracking data isn’t going to guarantee more accurate predictions however. You will also need a way to store and quickly access this data. Most businesses use a data warehouse which allows for easier tracking, combining, and analyzing of data.

As a business manager you likely don’t have the time to look after data and implement a full-on warehousing and storage solution. What you will most likely need to do is work with a provider, like us, who can help establish an effective warehouse solution, and an analytics expert who can help ensure that you are tracking the right, and most useful, data.

Component 2: statistics

Love it, or hate it, statistics, and more specifically regression analysis, is an integral part of predictive analytics. Most predictive analytics starts with usually a manager or data scientist wondering if different sets of data are correlated. For example, is the age, income, and sex of a customer (independent variables) related to when they purchase product X (dependent variable)?

Using data that has been collected from various customer touch points – say a customer loyalty card, past purchases made by the customer, data found on social media, and visits to a website – you can run a regression analysis to see if there is in fact a correlation between independent and dependent variables, and just how related individual independent variables are.

From here, usually after some trial and error, you hopefully can come up with a regression equation and assign what’s called regression coefficients – how much each variable affects the outcome – to each of the independent variables.

This equation can then be applied to predict outcomes. To carry on the example above, you can figure out exactly how influential each independent variable is to the sale of product X. If you find that income and age of different customers heavily influences sales, you can usually also predict when customers of a certain age and income level will buy (by comparing the analysis with past sales data). From here, you can schedule promotions, stock extra products, or even begin marketing to other non-customers who fall into the same categories.

Component 3: assumptions

Because predictive analytics focuses on the future, which is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy, you need to rely on assumptions for this type of analytics to actually work. While there are likely many assumptions you will need to acknowledge, the biggest is: the future will be the same as the past.

As a business owner or manager you are going to need to be aware of the assumptions made for each model or question you are trying to predict the answer to. This also means that you will need to be revisiting these on a regular basis to ensure they are still true or valid. If something changes, say buying habits, then the predictions in place will be invalid and potentially useless.

Remember the 2008-09 sub-prime mortgage crisis? Well, one of the main reasons this was so huge was because brokers and analysts assumed that people would always be able to pay their mortgages, and built their prediction models off of this assumption. We all know what happened there. While this is a large scale example, it is a powerful lesson to learn: Not checking that the assumptions you have based your predictions on could lead to massive trouble for your company.

By understanding the basic ideas behind these three components, you will be better able to communicate and leverage the results provided by this form of analytics.

If you are looking to implement a solution that can support your analytics, or to learn more about predictive analytics, contact us today to see how we can help.

Posted in Business Intelligence, General Articles A | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

3 Parts of predictive analytics

BI_Sep08_CPredictive analytics has long been employed by large-scale businesses to help make decisions and long-term business predictions. Now, small to medium businesses are starting to integrate these methods in larger numbers. A common stumbling block for many managers and owners however is that this can be a highly overwhelming concept. To help, here is an overview of the three main components of predictive analytics business owners and managers should be aware of.

Together, these three elements of predictive analytics enables data scientists and even managers to conduct and analyze forecasts and predictions.

Component 1: data

As with most business processes, data is one of the most important and vital components. Without data you won’t be able to make predictions and the decisions necessary to reach desired outcomes. In other words, data is the foundation of predictive analytics.

If you want predictive analytics to be successful, you need not only the right kind of data but information that is useful in helping answer the main question you are trying to predict or forecast. You need to to collect as much relevant data as possible in relation to what you are trying to predict. This means tracking past data, customers, demographics, and more.

Merely tracking data isn’t going to guarantee more accurate predictions however. You will also need a way to store and quickly access this data. Most businesses use a data warehouse which allows for easier tracking, combining, and analyzing of data.

As a business manager you likely don’t have the time to look after data and implement a full-on warehousing and storage solution. What you will most likely need to do is work with a provider, like us, who can help establish an effective warehouse solution, and an analytics expert who can help ensure that you are tracking the right, and most useful, data.

Component 2: statistics

Love it, or hate it, statistics, and more specifically regression analysis, is an integral part of predictive analytics. Most predictive analytics starts with usually a manager or data scientist wondering if different sets of data are correlated. For example, is the age, income, and sex of a customer (independent variables) related to when they purchase product X (dependent variable)?

Using data that has been collected from various customer touch points – say a customer loyalty card, past purchases made by the customer, data found on social media, and visits to a website – you can run a regression analysis to see if there is in fact a correlation between independent and dependent variables, and just how related individual independent variables are.

From here, usually after some trial and error, you hopefully can come up with a regression equation and assign what’s called regression coefficients – how much each variable affects the outcome – to each of the independent variables.

This equation can then be applied to predict outcomes. To carry on the example above, you can figure out exactly how influential each independent variable is to the sale of product X. If you find that income and age of different customers heavily influences sales, you can usually also predict when customers of a certain age and income level will buy (by comparing the analysis with past sales data). From here, you can schedule promotions, stock extra products, or even begin marketing to other non-customers who fall into the same categories.

Component 3: assumptions

Because predictive analytics focuses on the future, which is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy, you need to rely on assumptions for this type of analytics to actually work. While there are likely many assumptions you will need to acknowledge, the biggest is: the future will be the same as the past.

As a business owner or manager you are going to need to be aware of the assumptions made for each model or question you are trying to predict the answer to. This also means that you will need to be revisiting these on a regular basis to ensure they are still true or valid. If something changes, say buying habits, then the predictions in place will be invalid and potentially useless.

Remember the 2008-09 sub-prime mortgage crisis? Well, one of the main reasons this was so huge was because brokers and analysts assumed that people would always be able to pay their mortgages, and built their prediction models off of this assumption. We all know what happened there. While this is a large scale example, it is a powerful lesson to learn: Not checking that the assumptions you have based your predictions on could lead to massive trouble for your company.

By understanding the basic ideas behind these three components, you will be better able to communicate and leverage the results provided by this form of analytics.

If you are looking to implement a solution that can support your analytics, or to learn more about predictive analytics, contact us today to see how we can help.

Posted in Business Intelligence, General Articles C | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Components of predictive analytics

BI_Sep08_BWhen it comes to the success of your business, you likely rely, at least in part, on predictions made off of existing data. While simple forecasts are easy enough, it can be more difficult to set down long-term theories about what the future may or may not entail. That’s why many businesses employ predictive analytics. While long used by enterprises, many smaller companies are also now starting to use these methods as well. At first glance, predictive analytics can be overwhelming, so, to help, here is an overview of the three main components.

Together, these three elements of predictive analytics enables data scientists and even managers to conduct and analyze forecasts and predictions.

Component 1: data

As with most business processes, data is one of the most important and vital components. Without data you won’t be able to make predictions and the decisions necessary to reach desired outcomes. In other words, data is the foundation of predictive analytics.

If you want predictive analytics to be successful, you need not only the right kind of data but information that is useful in helping answer the main question you are trying to predict or forecast. You need to to collect as much relevant data as possible in relation to what you are trying to predict. This means tracking past data, customers, demographics, and more.

Merely tracking data isn’t going to guarantee more accurate predictions however. You will also need a way to store and quickly access this data. Most businesses use a data warehouse which allows for easier tracking, combining, and analyzing of data.

As a business manager you likely don’t have the time to look after data and implement a full-on warehousing and storage solution. What you will most likely need to do is work with a provider, like us, who can help establish an effective warehouse solution, and an analytics expert who can help ensure that you are tracking the right, and most useful, data.

Component 2: statistics

Love it, or hate it, statistics, and more specifically regression analysis, is an integral part of predictive analytics. Most predictive analytics starts with usually a manager or data scientist wondering if different sets of data are correlated. For example, is the age, income, and sex of a customer (independent variables) related to when they purchase product X (dependent variable)?

Using data that has been collected from various customer touch points – say a customer loyalty card, past purchases made by the customer, data found on social media, and visits to a website – you can run a regression analysis to see if there is in fact a correlation between independent and dependent variables, and just how related individual independent variables are.

From here, usually after some trial and error, you hopefully can come up with a regression equation and assign what’s called regression coefficients – how much each variable affects the outcome – to each of the independent variables.

This equation can then be applied to predict outcomes. To carry on the example above, you can figure out exactly how influential each independent variable is to the sale of product X. If you find that income and age of different customers heavily influences sales, you can usually also predict when customers of a certain age and income level will buy (by comparing the analysis with past sales data). From here, you can schedule promotions, stock extra products, or even begin marketing to other non-customers who fall into the same categories.

Component 3: assumptions

Because predictive analytics focuses on the future, which is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy, you need to rely on assumptions for this type of analytics to actually work. While there are likely many assumptions you will need to acknowledge, the biggest is: the future will be the same as the past.

As a business owner or manager you are going to need to be aware of the assumptions made for each model or question you are trying to predict the answer to. This also means that you will need to be revisiting these on a regular basis to ensure they are still true or valid. If something changes, say buying habits, then the predictions in place will be invalid and potentially useless.

Remember the 2008-09 sub-prime mortgage crisis? Well, one of the main reasons this was so huge was because brokers and analysts assumed that people would always be able to pay their mortgages, and built their prediction models off of this assumption. We all know what happened there. While this is a large scale example, it is a powerful lesson to learn: Not checking that the assumptions you have based your predictions on could lead to massive trouble for your company.

By understanding the basic ideas behind these three components, you will be better able to communicate and leverage the results provided by this form of analytics.

If you are looking to implement a solution that can support your analytics, or to learn more about predictive analytics, contact us today to see how we can help.

Posted in Business Intelligence, General Articles B | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Selling your phone? Read this first!

MobileGeneral_Sep08_CSmartphones and tablets have become one of the most essential devices for businesses and individuals alike. It’s difficult to imagine life without one really, but there will come a time when we all need to replace a device. If you are considering this then you may entertain the idea of selling your old device too. However, before you do, you should ensure that you deauthenticate your apps first.

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won’t be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.

  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn’t have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don’t have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.

When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Posted in General Articles C, Mobile Phone – General | Tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

Read this before selling your phone!

MobileGeneral_Sep08_BOur mobile devices are quickly becoming so highly integrated into our lives that it can be difficult to imagine life without them. But, there will come a time when you decide to upgrade to a new device. When this does happen, you may consider selling your old device. If you do decide to do this, one thing you should ensure you have done is to deauthenticate your apps.

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won’t be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.

  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn’t have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don’t have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.

When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Posted in General Articles B, Mobile Phone – General | Tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

Before selling your phone, read this!

MobileGeneral_Sep08_AWhen you go to upgrade your phone you may consider selling your old one. However, one issue you may face is having a number of apps on your device that contain personal information. You need to take care that you deauthenticate apps when you’re considering getting rid of, or selling your upgraded devices. The next question is which apps should you be looking out for?

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won’t be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.

  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn’t have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don’t have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.

When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Posted in General Articles A, Mobile Phone – General | Tagged , , | Comments closed

Subscribe to Office 365 from iPad

iPad_Seo08_CA common feature in many new apps is enabling users to purchase or subscribe to features in-app. This is especially true for developers like Microsoft and their Office for iPad apps which require a subscription in order to use the full versions. In a recent announcement from the Redmond tech giant, Office for iPad users can now subscribe via the app.

Looking at the recent subscription update

When the iPad versions of the Office apps were released, users could download the apps for free but needed an Office 365 subscription in order to use the full features of the apps. Those who didn’t have a subscription were limited to only being able to read and print Office documents, and present using PowerPoint.

Those who wanted to use all the features of the app needed to sign up for an Office 365 account. In order to do this, they had to physically go to the Office 365 site and sign up. They couldn’t sign up via the app. While this process isn’t overly taxing, it did cause some frustration for some users.

To remedy this, Microsoft has recently announced that users will now be able to sign up for an Office 365 subscription directly from the app. According to an article posted on the Microsoft Office blog, “Starting today [September 2, 2014], you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad.”

The subscriptions you can purchase

While Microsoft has noted that you can purchase an Office 365 subscription in-app, you should be aware that the subscriptions are monthly and for the Home or Personal versions of Office 365.

A monthly Office 365 Home subscription costs USD$9.99 a month and can be used on one iPad and up to five PCs or Macs, while an Office 365 Personal plan costs USD$6.99 a month and can be installed on on iPad and one PC or Mac.

What about business users?

For the time being, users can only subscribe to individual Office 365 accounts via the app. If your business has an Office 365 for Business subscription e.g., Office 365 Small Business Premium, etc, you should be able to access the full-version of the iPad app without having to sign up for a Personal or Home subscription, just log in using the same username and password you use to sign into Office 365.

If you don’t have an Office 365 subscription, then it may be a good idea to get in touch with us to learn more about Office 365 business plans and how they can be successfully implemented into your business.

Posted in General Articles C, Mobile Tablet – iPad | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Office for iPad’s in-app subscription

iPad_Seo08_BMicrosoft has been making a steady push into mobile markets, especially when it comes to apps. One of their biggest, and most helpful, releases has been mobile optimized versions of their popular Office programs. While Office for iPad is useful for many business users, you do need a subscription to access all the features. Microsoft has recently announced that they have updated the iPad apps and added in-app subscriptions.

Looking at the recent subscription update

When the iPad versions of the Office apps were released, users could download the apps for free but needed an Office 365 subscription in order to use the full features of the apps. Those who didn’t have a subscription were limited to only being able to read and print Office documents, and present using PowerPoint.

Those who wanted to use all the features of the app needed to sign up for an Office 365 account. In order to do this, they had to physically go to the Office 365 site and sign up. They couldn’t sign up via the app. While this process isn’t overly taxing, it did cause some frustration for some users.

To remedy this, Microsoft has recently announced that users will now be able to sign up for an Office 365 subscription directly from the app. According to an article posted on the Microsoft Office blog, “Starting today [September 2, 2014], you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad.”

The subscriptions you can purchase

While Microsoft has noted that you can purchase an Office 365 subscription in-app, you should be aware that the subscriptions are monthly and for the Home or Personal versions of Office 365.

A monthly Office 365 Home subscription costs USD$9.99 a month and can be used on one iPad and up to five PCs or Macs, while an Office 365 Personal plan costs USD$6.99 a month and can be installed on on iPad and one PC or Mac.

What about business users?

For the time being, users can only subscribe to individual Office 365 accounts via the app. If your business has an Office 365 for Business subscription e.g., Office 365 Small Business Premium, etc, you should be able to access the full-version of the iPad app without having to sign up for a Personal or Home subscription, just log in using the same username and password you use to sign into Office 365.

If you don’t have an Office 365 subscription, then it may be a good idea to get in touch with us to learn more about Office 365 business plans and how they can be successfully implemented into your business.

Posted in General Articles B, Mobile Phone – iPhone | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Office apps for iPad updated

iPad_Seo08_AEarlier this year, software giant Microsoft released iPad specific Office apps, which many iPad users have been eagerly awaiting. While these apps bring full-versions of the four most popular Office programs to the iPad, you do need an Office 365 account in order to get the most out of them. Microsoft has also recently updated the Office for iPad apps, introducing in-app subscriptions.

Looking at the recent subscription update

When the iPad versions of the Office apps were released, users could download the apps for free but needed an Office 365 subscription in order to use the full features of the apps. Those who didn’t have a subscription were limited to only being able to read and print Office documents, and present using PowerPoint.

Those who wanted to use all the features of the app needed to sign up for an Office 365 account. In order to do this, they had to physically go to the Office 365 site and sign up. They couldn’t sign up via the app. While this process isn’t overly taxing, it did cause some frustration for some users.

To remedy this, Microsoft has recently announced that users will now be able to sign up for an Office 365 subscription directly from the app. According to an article posted on the Microsoft Office blog, “Starting today [September 2, 2014], you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad.”

The subscriptions you can purchase

While Microsoft has noted that you can purchase an Office 365 subscription in-app, you should be aware that the subscriptions are monthly and for the Home or Personal versions of Office 365.

A monthly Office 365 Home subscription costs USD$9.99 a month and can be used on one iPad and up to five PCs or Macs, while an Office 365 Personal plan costs USD$6.99 a month and can be installed on on iPad and one PC or Mac.

What about business users?

For the time being, users can only subscribe to individual Office 365 accounts via the app. If your business has an Office 365 for Business subscription e.g., Office 365 Small Business Premium, etc, you should be able to access the full-version of the iPad app without having to sign up for a Personal or Home subscription, just log in using the same username and password you use to sign into Office 365.

If you don’t have an Office 365 subscription, then it may be a good idea to get in touch with us to learn more about Office 365 business plans and how they can be successfully implemented into your business.

Posted in General Articles A, Mobile Tablet – iPad | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed

Using concatenate in Excel

Office_Sep08_CIf you use Excel there is a good chance that you have used a wide variety of formulas. But, when it comes to working out how to combine the content of different cells into a new one, without adding them together, many users will simply cut and paste. Did you know though that the concatenate formula can also do this for you?

Using the concatenate formula to combine cells

If, for example, you have a spreadsheet with first names in column A, last names in column B, and want to combine them into column C to display the full name you can do so by:

  1. Clicking on cell C2 (or the row where the information you want to combine is)
  2. Typing =concatenate(
  3. Clicking on cell A2 and then adding a comma (,)
  4. Clicking on cell B2 and closing the formula with a closing bracket
  5. Hitting Enter

You should see the two cells are now combined in cell C2, with the formula for cell C2 reading:

=CONCATENATE(A2,B2).

The problem is, there will be no space inbetween the letters or numbers, so you will need to edit the formula to read:

=CONCATENATE(A2,” “,B2)

The double quotations with a space in between them tells Excel to add a space to the cell in between the contents of A2 and B2.

If you have more than two columns you would like to combine, then simply add a comma after each cell. If for example you have three columns (A1, B1, and C1) you would enter the formula:

=CONCATENATE(A1 ” “,B1 ” “,C1) in column D1.

Combining two cells without concatenate

While concatenate works well, there is actually a shortcut that you can use which involves the ampersand ‘&’:

  1. Click on cell C2 (or the row where the information you want to combine is)
  2. Type =
  3. Click on cell A2 and then type & in the formula.
  4. Click on B2 and hit Enter

You should see the contents of A2 and B2 combined together in C2. If you click on cell C2 and look at the formula, it should read: =A2&B2.

The only problem is, there won’t be a space between the content. To add a space, you can edit the formula so that it reads:

=A2&” “&B2

Note the space between the two quotation marks. This tells Excel to add a space between the contents of A2 and B2.

Once you have the base formula on one cell, you can press the small box at the bottom of the cell and drag it down the row so that the other information can be quickly compiled. This makes it much easier than having to copy and paste the content individually. And, If you would like to learn more Excel tips, contact us today. We can save you valuable time and resources.

Posted in General Articles C, Microsoft Office – News & Tips | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed
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