Turning off Android location settings

androidphone_Aug26_CWhile location services on your Android smartphone make it easier for you to use certain apps or functions like photo tagging, sometimes it’s best to hide your location since they can affect your device’s security. With that in mind, isn’t it time you took a look at how to change different location settings on your Android smartphone to enhance its security?

Photos and GPS tagging

Your Android smartphone gives you the ability to attach GPS coordinates to the pictures you take, known as geo-locating or GPS tagging. This lets you arrange pictures in albums by locations, or lets Google+ stitch together stories of your trips. Geo-locating images in itself isn’t a bad thing, but you can get into trouble when you broadcast sensitive locations to the world. For instance, a picture of your expensive watch with a GPS tag of your house isn’t the best idea.

Four ways to control geo-locating photos:

  1. Go to your camera settings and you’ll find an on/off toggle.
  2. Simply go into Settings>Location and from there you can decide if you want the location saved along with your images.
  3. Download an EXIF editor and manually remove the location information from specific images.
  4. You can also turn off location services altogether by going to Settings>Location.

Discrete location settings

Apart from location settings in photos and GPS tagging, Android actually has three discrete location settings which allow you to set how accurately you want location reporting to be. You can find these at Settings>Location, Note that this affects your smartphone’s battery life immensely.

  • High accuracy: This uses the GPS radio in your phone to pinpoint its exact location from satellites while making use of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular networks too.
  • Battery saving: This mode only uses Wi-Fi networks and mobile networks to identify locations, and while it might not be as accurate it will help your phone last longer.
  • Device sensors only: This only uses the GPS radio to find you. It may take a little more time to find your location since it’s not using nearby Wi-Fi and mobile networks to get your general location first. This also uses more battery.

Having your location settings turned off will not only help keep your smartphone’s security intact, but also help strengthen your smartphone’s battery life. Interested in learning more about Android phones and their functions? We have solutions for you and your business.

Posted in General Articles C, Mobile Phone – Android | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Android location settings 101

androidphone_Aug26_BAs you learn about the different features of your Android smartphone, you’ll no doubt come across is location services and whether or not you want to approve these. While you might think this convenient feature can do you no harm, think again. Sometimes it’s best to hide your location in your smartphone as this can affect your device’s security. With this in mind, let’s take a look at how to change different location settings on your Android smartphone.

Photos and GPS tagging

Your Android smartphone gives you the ability to attach GPS coordinates to the pictures you take, known as geo-locating or GPS tagging. This lets you arrange pictures in albums by locations, or lets Google+ stitch together stories of your trips. Geo-locating images in itself isn’t a bad thing, but you can get into trouble when you broadcast sensitive locations to the world. For instance, a picture of your expensive watch with a GPS tag of your house isn’t the best idea.

Four ways to control geo-locating photos:

  1. Go to your camera settings and you’ll find an on/off toggle.
  2. Simply go into Settings>Location and from there you can decide if you want the location saved along with your images.
  3. Download an EXIF editor and manually remove the location information from specific images.
  4. You can also turn off location services altogether by going to Settings>Location.

Discrete location settings

Apart from location settings in photos and GPS tagging, Android actually has three discrete location settings which allow you to set how accurately you want location reporting to be. You can find these at Settings>Location, Note that this affects your smartphone’s battery life immensely.

  • High accuracy: This uses the GPS radio in your phone to pinpoint its exact location from satellites while making use of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular networks too.
  • Battery saving: This mode only uses Wi-Fi networks and mobile networks to identify locations, and while it might not be as accurate it will help your phone last longer.
  • Device sensors only: This only uses the GPS radio to find you. It may take a little more time to find your location since it’s not using nearby Wi-Fi and mobile networks to get your general location first. This also uses more battery.

Having your location settings turned off will not only help keep your smartphone’s security intact, but also help strengthen your smartphone’s battery life. Interested in learning more about Android phones and their functions? We have solutions for you and your business.

Posted in General Articles B, Mobile Phone – Android | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Changing Android location settings

androidphone_Aug26_AWhen you first get your hands on your Android smartphone, you’ll be asked about location services and whether you want to enable them. Google and your carrier will have its own location services that you’ll need to approve as well. But what you might not know is that there are actually a few other options for location services with Android which can affect your smartphone’s security. To that end, let’s take a look at how to change some of these Android settings.

Photos and GPS tagging

Your Android smartphone gives you the ability to attach GPS coordinates to the pictures you take, known as geo-locating or GPS tagging. This lets you arrange pictures in albums by locations, or lets Google+ stitch together stories of your trips. Geo-locating images in itself isn’t a bad thing, but you can get into trouble when you broadcast sensitive locations to the world. For instance, a picture of your expensive watch with a GPS tag of your house isn’t the best idea.

Four ways to control geo-locating photos:

  1. Go to your camera settings and you’ll find an on/off toggle.
  2. Simply go into Settings>Location and from there you can decide if you want the location saved along with your images.
  3. Download an EXIF editor and manually remove the location information from specific images.
  4. You can also turn off location services altogether by going to Settings>Location.

Discrete location settings

Apart from location settings in photos and GPS tagging, Android actually has three discrete location settings which allow you to set how accurately you want location reporting to be. You can find these at Settings>Location, Note that this affects your smartphone’s battery life immensely.

  • High accuracy: This uses the GPS radio in your phone to pinpoint its exact location from satellites while making use of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular networks too.
  • Battery saving: This mode only uses Wi-Fi networks and mobile networks to identify locations, and while it might not be as accurate it will help your phone last longer.
  • Device sensors only: This only uses the GPS radio to find you. It may take a little more time to find your location since it’s not using nearby Wi-Fi and mobile networks to get your general location first. This also uses more battery.

Having your location settings turned off will not only help keep your smartphone’s security intact, but also help strengthen your smartphone’s battery life. Interested in learning more about Android phones and their functions? We have solutions for you and your business.

Posted in General Articles A, Mobile Phone – Android | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Common VoIP issues to be aware of

VoIP_Aug18_CAs with any technological systems, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) can offer businesses some intriguing benefits, including decreased costs and easier management. Because of these advantages, many businesses have already switched over. For those who are considering making the move, there are a few points you should be aware of first.

1. Faxing can be tough with VoIP

Fax machines were designed on an analog system and therefore may have trouble working with a digital system like VoIP. This is especially true for businesses who are using older fax machines. We aren’t saying faxing is impossible, but you likely will not be able to simply plug your fax machine into a VoIP line and start sending/receiving faxes.

What you will most likely need is to install a few extra components such as an adapter that supports T38 protocols. The T38 protocol was developed specifically to change analog fax signals into a digital that can then be sent via VoIP.

Therefore, if you use fax machines in your office, you should be sure to ask potential providers if their systems support faxing, and if your machines will be supported, or if there are any extra components needed.

2. Credit and debit terminals may not be compatible

Many business owners who look to move to VoIP systems often forget to also look at how their payment systems work. If you are using older credit or debit terminals on a landline they may actually be dial-up based, which means they will not work with VoIP. While most businesses already use newer models that support ethernet connections, and therefore VoIP, some are still using older systems. If this is the case, then you will need to contact your terminal provider for an upgrade, or new IP-terminals.

3. Older alarm systems may not work

Businesses with physical storefronts likely have alarm systems in place. The problem with this is that many older systems rely on traditional phone lines in order to signal emergency services should the alarm go off. If you are planning to upgrade to VoIP, you should make sure that the alarm system you have is compatible, or can be connected to VoIP.

If this is not the case, you may need to upgrade to a more modern alarm system. We strongly recommend checking with both the alarm provider and your VoIP provider if your alarm systems will still work.

4. VoIP requires broadband connections

We have seen cases before where businesses have invested in a VoIP system only to find out they don’t have a broadband connection that is strong enough to support VoIP effectively. In order for VoIP systems to function, you need to have a broadband connection with a fairly strong amount of bandwidth. This is especially important for businesses in rural areas where broadband speeds can be limited based on distance.

It can be tough to figure out if your broadband connection will support VoIP, but you can test the connection before you agree to purchase it. Asking a potential provider for help testing your line would be a good idea. Should your connection prove to be too slow, then you will need to contact your Internet Service Provider in order to upgrade your speed.

5. VoIP needs to be managed

Like every other tech system, you will need to manage your VoIP solution. This includes adding new lines, upgrading equipment, ensuring systems are compatible, etc. For many business owners this will require extra time they don’t necessarily have. One of the best solutions we can recommend is a managed VoIP solution.

We offer VoIP solutions, so if you are looking to learn more about VoIP in your business, and would like to avoid the common mistakes made by others, contact us today to learn more about how our expertise can help.

Posted in General Articles C, VoIP – General | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

VoIP issues to be aware of

VoIP_Aug18_BVoice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, has become one of the most popular communication methods used by businesses of all sizes. While there are many benefits VoIP can offer, including decreased costs, increased functions, and more, some businesses considering switching to VoIP should be aware of some potential problems that may run into.

1. Faxing can be tough with VoIP

Fax machines were designed on an analog system and therefore may have trouble working with a digital system like VoIP. This is especially true for businesses who are using older fax machines. We aren’t saying faxing is impossible, but you likely will not be able to simply plug your fax machine into a VoIP line and start sending/receiving faxes.

What you will most likely need is to install a few extra components such as an adapter that supports T38 protocols. The T38 protocol was developed specifically to change analog fax signals into a digital that can then be sent via VoIP.

Therefore, if you use fax machines in your office, you should be sure to ask potential providers if their systems support faxing, and if your machines will be supported, or if there are any extra components needed.

2. Credit and debit terminals may not be compatible

Many business owners who look to move to VoIP systems often forget to also look at how their payment systems work. If you are using older credit or debit terminals on a landline they may actually be dial-up based, which means they will not work with VoIP. While most businesses already use newer models that support ethernet connections, and therefore VoIP, some are still using older systems. If this is the case, then you will need to contact your terminal provider for an upgrade, or new IP-terminals.

3. Older alarm systems may not work

Businesses with physical storefronts likely have alarm systems in place. The problem with this is that many older systems rely on traditional phone lines in order to signal emergency services should the alarm go off. If you are planning to upgrade to VoIP, you should make sure that the alarm system you have is compatible, or can be connected to VoIP.

If this is not the case, you may need to upgrade to a more modern alarm system. We strongly recommend checking with both the alarm provider and your VoIP provider if your alarm systems will still work.

4. VoIP requires broadband connections

We have seen cases before where businesses have invested in a VoIP system only to find out they don’t have a broadband connection that is strong enough to support VoIP effectively. In order for VoIP systems to function, you need to have a broadband connection with a fairly strong amount of bandwidth. This is especially important for businesses in rural areas where broadband speeds can be limited based on distance.

It can be tough to figure out if your broadband connection will support VoIP, but you can test the connection before you agree to purchase it. Asking a potential provider for help testing your line would be a good idea. Should your connection prove to be too slow, then you will need to contact your Internet Service Provider in order to upgrade your speed.

5. VoIP needs to be managed

Like every other tech system, you will need to manage your VoIP solution. This includes adding new lines, upgrading equipment, ensuring systems are compatible, etc. For many business owners this will require extra time they don’t necessarily have. One of the best solutions we can recommend is a managed VoIP solution.

We offer VoIP solutions, so if you are looking to learn more about VoIP in your business, and would like to avoid the common mistakes made by others, contact us today to learn more about how our expertise can help.

Posted in General Articles B, VoIP – General | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

What to be aware of with VoIP

VoIP_Aug18_AVoIP, or Voice over Internet Protocol, has become one of the main forms of voice communication used in businesses of all sizes. Because the system uses an Internet connection, many companies often experience decreased costs while being able to do more with than they could with their traditional phone line. While almost every business can benefit from VoIP, there are a few important issues businesses who are considering switching over should be aware of.

1. Faxing can be tough with VoIP

Fax machines were designed on an analog system and therefore may have trouble working with a digital system like VoIP. This is especially true for businesses who are using older fax machines. We aren’t saying faxing is impossible, but you likely will not be able to simply plug your fax machine into a VoIP line and start sending/receiving faxes.

What you will most likely need is to install a few extra components such as an adapter that supports T38 protocols. The T38 protocol was developed specifically to change analog fax signals into a digital that can then be sent via VoIP.

Therefore, if you use fax machines in your office, you should be sure to ask potential providers if their systems support faxing, and if your machines will be supported, or if there are any extra components needed.

2. Credit and debit terminals may not be compatible

Many business owners who look to move to VoIP systems often forget to also look at how their payment systems work. If you are using older credit or debit terminals on a landline they may actually be dial-up based, which means they will not work with VoIP. While most businesses already use newer models that support ethernet connections, and therefore VoIP, some are still using older systems. If this is the case, then you will need to contact your terminal provider for an upgrade, or new IP-terminals.

3. Older alarm systems may not work

Businesses with physical storefronts likely have alarm systems in place. The problem with this is that many older systems rely on traditional phone lines in order to signal emergency services should the alarm go off. If you are planning to upgrade to VoIP, you should make sure that the alarm system you have is compatible, or can be connected to VoIP.

If this is not the case, you may need to upgrade to a more modern alarm system. We strongly recommend checking with both the alarm provider and your VoIP provider if your alarm systems will still work.

4. VoIP requires broadband connections

We have seen cases before where businesses have invested in a VoIP system only to find out they don’t have a broadband connection that is strong enough to support VoIP effectively. In order for VoIP systems to function, you need to have a broadband connection with a fairly strong amount of bandwidth. This is especially important for businesses in rural areas where broadband speeds can be limited based on distance.

It can be tough to figure out if your broadband connection will support VoIP, but you can test the connection before you agree to purchase it. Asking a potential provider for help testing your line would be a good idea. Should your connection prove to be too slow, then you will need to contact your Internet Service Provider in order to upgrade your speed.

5. VoIP needs to be managed

Like every other tech system, you will need to manage your VoIP solution. This includes adding new lines, upgrading equipment, ensuring systems are compatible, etc. For many business owners this will require extra time they don’t necessarily have. One of the best solutions we can recommend is a managed VoIP solution.

We offer VoIP solutions, so if you are looking to learn more about VoIP in your business, and would like to avoid the common mistakes made by others, contact us today to learn more about how our expertise can help.

Posted in General Articles A, VoIP – General | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Gmail supports more languages

googleapps_Aug25_ADid you know that when signing up for a new Gmail account, users could only use a specific set of characters and numbers? In early August, Google announced that they would be expanding the characters supported by Gmail. While this may not be the biggest deal to many, there is a potential security issue related to this that users should be aware of.

Google’s recent character announcement

Until early August, any user who emails from a Gmail account had to use latin characters and numbers e.g., A-Z, and 1-9. While this fits for some users, there are a great number who have names and email addresses that use characters not in the standard English alphabet like ‘É’ or ‘à’. In an effort to make things easier for a greater number of Google users, the company recently expanded support for different characters.

This means that Gmail will now understand addresses that use different scripts from the standard basic Latin alphabet (letters A to Z and numbers 0 to 9). According to Google, “This means Gmail users can send emails to, and receive emails from, people who have these characters in their email addresses.”

Some of the scripts now supported include Katakana, Hong Kong (traditional Chinese), accented Latin characters, etc. While users with email addresses can send Gmail users emails, and vice versa, they are currently not supported by Google’s account names. In other words, users who want to sign up for a Gmail account still need to use the basic Latin alphabet.

Why is this a potential security risk?

At first glance, this may not seem like the biggest security risk. Especially because many businesses have email addresses that use the basic Latin alphabet. But there is a security threat here, especially when you start to look at the characters used in other languages. Take for example the greek letter for lowercase omicron (ο) which looks a lot like our o.

When we write these letters on paper, they look the same to us, and there is no real harm. But when they are online, computers will read them as different. This is because of what is called Unicode. Unicode is a universal standard that dictates the difference between characters.

To us, the lowercase omicron and our letter ‘o’ look the same. But to computers, lowercase omicron is represented by the unicode: U+03BF, while the letter ‘o’ is represented by the unicode: U+006F.

Smart hackers will likely quickly figure out that they can replace basic Latin characters with others, and generate email addresses that take advantage of this. For example, you could see an email come into your Inbox from facebook.com, where one of the characters is actually an omicron. To us, there is no visual difference, but to the computer, the addresses are completely different. The email could have links to malware or tracking software that could lead to a breach in security.

Is anything being done to stop these characters from being exploited?

According to a post on the Google blog, the tech giant realizes this could be a potential security issue. “The Unicode community has identified suspicious combinations of letters that could be misleading, and Gmail will now begin rejecting emails with such combinations. We’re using an open standard—the Unicode Consortium’s “Highly Restricted” designation—which we believe strikes a healthy balance between legitimate uses of these new domains and those likely to be abused.”

According to the Consortium, when applied to Gmail addresses, Highly Restrictive requires that characters must be from a single script, or from the combinations:

  • Latin + Han + Hiragana + Katakana,
  • Latin + Han + Bopomofo,
  • Latin + Han + Hangul

In other words, the overall security and legitimacy of addresses and sites that use other characters should be ensured..

What can we do?

To take it one step further, we also recommend that if you use Gmail, you look carefully at all email addresses. We can often spot the difference between letters and similar symbols used by other languages. If an address looks suspicious, it is a good idea to simply ignore or delete the email.

As with most other security measures, if you receive an email from large companies or institutions, such as banks, with what looks like a legitimate email address, always read the content closely. Almost every business and institution will never ask for you to provide passwords or login information in an email.

Essentially, ensure to be vigilant with email addresses, and if you have any further questions or concerns, contact us today to for our support solutions.

Posted in Cloud – Google Apps, General Articles A | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Gmail supports more characters

googleapps_Aug25_CDid you know that until recently, Google has only supported email addresses that use specific characters and numbers? While this is fine for many users, some do business with users who have email addresses outside of the older supported characters. Google has recently announced a change to the characters they support. While this is a good move, this change could pose a security risk.

Google’s recent character announcement

Until early August, any user who emails from a Gmail account had to use latin characters and numbers e.g., A-Z, and 1-9. While this fits for some users, there are a great number who have names and email addresses that use characters not in the standard English alphabet like ‘É’ or ‘à’. In an effort to make things easier for a greater number of Google users, the company recently expanded support for different characters.

This means that Gmail will now understand addresses that use different scripts from the standard basic Latin alphabet (letters A to Z and numbers 0 to 9). According to Google, “This means Gmail users can send emails to, and receive emails from, people who have these characters in their email addresses.”

Some of the scripts now supported include Katakana, Hong Kong (traditional Chinese), accented Latin characters, etc. While users with email addresses can send Gmail users emails, and vice versa, they are currently not supported by Google’s account names. In other words, users who want to sign up for a Gmail account still need to use the basic Latin alphabet.

Why is this a potential security risk?

At first glance, this may not seem like the biggest security risk. Especially because many businesses have email addresses that use the basic Latin alphabet. But there is a security threat here, especially when you start to look at the characters used in other languages. Take for example the greek letter for lowercase omicron (ο) which looks a lot like our o.

When we write these letters on paper, they look the same to us, and there is no real harm. But when they are online, computers will read them as different. This is because of what is called Unicode. Unicode is a universal standard that dictates the difference between characters.

To us, the lowercase omicron and our letter ‘o’ look the same. But to computers, lowercase omicron is represented by the unicode: U+03BF, while the letter ‘o’ is represented by the unicode: U+006F.

Smart hackers will likely quickly figure out that they can replace basic Latin characters with others, and generate email addresses that take advantage of this. For example, you could see an email come into your Inbox from facebook.com, where one of the characters is actually an omicron. To us, there is no visual difference, but to the computer, the addresses are completely different. The email could have links to malware or tracking software that could lead to a breach in security.

Is anything being done to stop these characters from being exploited?

According to a post on the Google blog, the tech giant realizes this could be a potential security issue. “The Unicode community has identified suspicious combinations of letters that could be misleading, and Gmail will now begin rejecting emails with such combinations. We’re using an open standard—the Unicode Consortium’s “Highly Restricted” designation—which we believe strikes a healthy balance between legitimate uses of these new domains and those likely to be abused.”

According to the Consortium, when applied to Gmail addresses, Highly Restrictive requires that characters must be from a single script, or from the combinations:

  • Latin + Han + Hiragana + Katakana,
  • Latin + Han + Bopomofo,
  • Latin + Han + Hangul

In other words, the overall security and legitimacy of addresses and sites that use other characters should be ensured..

What can we do?

To take it one step further, we also recommend that if you use Gmail, you look carefully at all email addresses. We can often spot the difference between letters and similar symbols used by other languages. If an address looks suspicious, it is a good idea to simply ignore or delete the email.

As with most other security measures, if you receive an email from large companies or institutions, such as banks, with what looks like a legitimate email address, always read the content closely. Almost every business and institution will never ask for you to provide passwords or login information in an email.

Essentially, ensure to be vigilant with email addresses, and if you have any further questions or concerns, contact us today to for our support solutions.

Posted in Cloud – Google Apps, General Articles C | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

More languages supported in Gmail

googleapps_Aug25_BWere you aware that when signing up for a new Gmail or Google account, users can only use a specific set of characters and numbers? While this is not an issue for many users, there are some who work with clients or suppliers who have email addresses that do not use these characters, making sending them emails via Gmail difficult. Google has recently announced a change to the characters supported by Gmail, one which could pose a bit of a security issue.

Google’s recent character announcement

Until early August, any user who emails from a Gmail account had to use latin characters and numbers e.g., A-Z, and 1-9. While this fits for some users, there are a great number who have names and email addresses that use characters not in the standard English alphabet like ‘É’ or ‘à’. In an effort to make things easier for a greater number of Google users, the company recently expanded support for different characters.

This means that Gmail will now understand addresses that use different scripts from the standard basic Latin alphabet (letters A to Z and numbers 0 to 9). According to Google, “This means Gmail users can send emails to, and receive emails from, people who have these characters in their email addresses.”

Some of the scripts now supported include Katakana, Hong Kong (traditional Chinese), accented Latin characters, etc. While users with email addresses can send Gmail users emails, and vice versa, they are currently not supported by Google’s account names. In other words, users who want to sign up for a Gmail account still need to use the basic Latin alphabet.

Why is this a potential security risk?

At first glance, this may not seem like the biggest security risk. Especially because many businesses have email addresses that use the basic Latin alphabet. But there is a security threat here, especially when you start to look at the characters used in other languages. Take for example the greek letter for lowercase omicron (ο) which looks a lot like our o.

When we write these letters on paper, they look the same to us, and there is no real harm. But when they are online, computers will read them as different. This is because of what is called Unicode. Unicode is a universal standard that dictates the difference between characters.

To us, the lowercase omicron and our letter ‘o’ look the same. But to computers, lowercase omicron is represented by the unicode: U+03BF, while the letter ‘o’ is represented by the unicode: U+006F.

Smart hackers will likely quickly figure out that they can replace basic Latin characters with others, and generate email addresses that take advantage of this. For example, you could see an email come into your Inbox from facebook.com, where one of the characters is actually an omicron. To us, there is no visual difference, but to the computer, the addresses are completely different. The email could have links to malware or tracking software that could lead to a breach in security.

Is anything being done to stop these characters from being exploited?

According to a post on the Google blog, the tech giant realizes this could be a potential security issue. “The Unicode community has identified suspicious combinations of letters that could be misleading, and Gmail will now begin rejecting emails with such combinations. We’re using an open standard—the Unicode Consortium’s “Highly Restricted” designation—which we believe strikes a healthy balance between legitimate uses of these new domains and those likely to be abused.”

According to the Consortium, when applied to Gmail addresses, Highly Restrictive requires that characters must be from a single script, or from the combinations:

  • Latin + Han + Hiragana + Katakana,
  • Latin + Han + Bopomofo,
  • Latin + Han + Hangul

In other words, the overall security and legitimacy of addresses and sites that use other characters should be ensured..

What can we do?

To take it one step further, we also recommend that if you use Gmail, you look carefully at all email addresses. We can often spot the difference between letters and similar symbols used by other languages. If an address looks suspicious, it is a good idea to simply ignore or delete the email.

As with most other security measures, if you receive an email from large companies or institutions, such as banks, with what looks like a legitimate email address, always read the content closely. Almost every business and institution will never ask for you to provide passwords or login information in an email.

Essentially, ensure to be vigilant with email addresses, and if you have any further questions or concerns, contact us today to for our support solutions.

Posted in Cloud – Google Apps, General Articles B | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed
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